Degrees and Requirements

Film, Video and Media

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The Film, Video and Media program is for students with a deep interest and appreciation of film and video within a media system closely related to communication and digital technology. The program seeks to provide students with an understanding of the aesthetic, social and cultural aspects of film and video on an international scale. Instruction in conceptualization; production, from inception to final product; editing; and distribution is provided. Students are encouraged to seek their own creative and protective endeavors in the broad and growing field of film and video. 

To successfully complete the Film, Video and Media major, the following are required:

  • 51 credits of Major Requirements
  • 18 credits of Major Electives
  • 37 credits of CORE Curriculum courses
  • 14 credits of General Electives

A minimum of 120 credits is required for degree, the last 30 of which must be completed at La Roche College.

Summary of Requirements

Major Electives: 18 Credits

  • CMET3007
    INTRO TO GAMES STUDIES |

    CMET3007
    INTRO TO GAMES STUDIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course is an introduction to the significance of games through human history and their evolving role in the digital age. The course will include examining how games are made, logical progressions of play, how games can teach as well as create narrative structures similar to film, television and literature.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide the student with a deep understanding of how a wide variety of games are produced by collaborative teams for purposes as varied as entertainment, training, marketing, sales, business and education. Students will be exposed to game logic, games for learning and training, and gamification concepts for a range of activities. Individual and group projects, research, surveys and simulations will all be major parts of the class learning activities. The social, cultural and economic implications and roles of games today and in the future will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET3007

  • ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING |

    ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to teach students how to write advertising copy that targets various audiences and employs multiple venues: print, radio, TV, and the internet. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012(H)

  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012

  • FVMA1025
    POST-PRODUCTION 1 |

    FVMA1025
    POST-PRODUCTION 1 |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the possibilities that digital technology offers for the manipulation of still images, sound and motion pictures. After introducing beginners to the Macintosh Operation System, the course allows students to use Final Cut Pro to edit video and sound and Photoshop to manipulate still images and text. Access to Macintosh computers with the necessary software is provided. Grading is based on assignments, a written exam and class participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA1050
    DRONES FOR PHOTO & VIDEO |

    FVMA1050
    DRONES FOR PHOTO & VIDEO |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) or "drone" technology is radically expanding the range and mobility of the camera for photography and video. In this course, the student will learn how to assemble and set up a UAV for flight, learn how to fly a multicopter type UAV, and practice shooting effective moving and still images. Topics covered will include: specific components of the UAV, cameras and camera stabilization systems. In addition to the equipment used, subject matter will include legal requirements and ramifications, flying to get the shot, and proper protocol for flying in public. Safety will be stressed throughout the semester. It is recommended but not required that students be prepared to purchase a ready-to-fly UAV early in the semester; the instructor will suggest specific models on the first class session. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA2030
    FILMMAKING 2: SIGHT & SOUND |

    FVMA2030
    FILMMAKING 2: SIGHT & SOUND |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this hands-on course students acquire the skills to design, shoot and edit video. The class combines demonstrations, lecture, exercise, projects and critiques. Emphasis is placed on visual and aural expression through technical mastery of the video medium. Topics include digital camera operations, lighting, audio recording, scripting, non-linear editing, special effects and audio mixing. Students are expected to focus on designing and producing an effective final project. Grading is based on written exams. All necessary equipment is provided but students must supply videotape. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    FVMA1001

  • GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY |

    GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will explore digital capture and handling of photographs enabling the student to master the technical aspects of digital image capture. Students will learn techniques for editing and enhancing photographs, become familiar with photography’s various roles: art form, journalism, advertising and will produce a portfolio of quality color and black and white prints from digital files. This course is for design majors only.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GCDN3046
    MULTIMEDIA |

    GCDN3046
    MULTIMEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an advanced study of multimedia and video design, theory and application for upper level Design students. Taught primarily on a MAC platform, this course utilizes software for digital video production. Class assignments will be closely related to GCDN3041 Graphic Design III, which will be taken concurrently during the second semester of the Junior year. The courses will be interrelated in terms of theory as well as outcome assessment.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN3045

  • SLAE1013
    INTRO TO PHOTOGRAPHY |

    SLAE1013
    INTRO TO PHOTOGRAPHY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of photography, including composition, lighting, and exposure. The course will cover the basic functions of smart phones & tablets and software. Images and issues in the History of Photography as well as in contemporary fine-art photographic practice will be explored. Aspects of black-and- white photography and printing will be included but, this is a digital photography course and working in a darkroom is not included. The course culminates in a final project which requires students to display their technical knowledge while creating a visually coherent group of images. Students must provide their own smart phone or tablet or DSLR camera and portable drive to take the course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTETHICS |

    SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTETHICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By "War", we do not mean any tale that has some conflict, fighting, or battle in it. These stories must be fictional or creative non-fiction (not a history textbook, for example)|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM |

    SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce non-majors to literary study through viewing film adaptations of Shakespeare in conjunction with reading the printed texts. By examining the relationship between the texts of the plays and their film interpretations, students will also be able to examine and analyze dramatic genres central to literary study and the study of Shakespeare: tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Requirements: 51 credits

  • CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION(SLSO1008) |

    CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION(SLSO1008) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course the student examines human, verbal, non-verbal and visual communication. Through an interactive classroom the student will combine the theory and definitions of the text with their experience to clarify and understand the concepts that make up human communication. In the classroom, writing, making presentations, working in groups, solving problems and applying creativity to the concepts of communication will be some of the ways the students learn and reinforce the subject matter. Written papers, research and computer-mediated-communication further reinforce the concepts of the course and serve as a means of evaluation of the student's understanding and absorption of the material. Cross-listed with SLSOC1008|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION |

    CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The subject matter of this course is the history and development of mass communication. The course will include examining the origin, economics, technology, mode of communication, communication effectiveness, social role and future of a variety of communication media including: newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film and computer-mediated-communication.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET1001 or SLSO1008

  • CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN & MEDIA |

    CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN & MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a broad examination of mass media as message design with an emphasis on understanding the visual, aural and contextual aspects of a variety of communications media such as: film, video, print media, outdoor advertising and web pages. Elements of control in message design, as well as conceptual frameworks in popular culture, will he addressed from still and moving images, to sound, color, texture and text. Message Design will prepare students entering fields of media production to under-stand the inherent meaning of every element of mass media construction.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to stimulate writing in prose and poetry, with emphasis on readings and exercises in craft.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2043
    FILM ANALYSIS:FORM,HIST,IDEOLOGY |

    ENGL2043
    FILM ANALYSIS:FORM,HIST,IDEOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will introduce students to the terminology, methodologies, and practice of cinematic analysis. We will approach films as complex, multi-layered texts that can be viewed through diverse, intersecting lenses; beginning with an examination of the form principles of film, we will progress to a consideration of film as historical, cultural, and ideological product, one that both shapes and is shaped by the beliefs and practices of the cultures in which it is generated. Class time will be divided between film viewing and film analysis, the ultimate purpose of the course being to prepare students to become active, critical viewers of film.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012(H)

  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012

  • FVMA1001
    FILMMAKING 1: FUNDAMENTALS |

    FVMA1001
    FILMMAKING 1: FUNDAMENTALS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Motion Picture Fundamentals is a hands-on introduction to key photographic concepts and the core concepts of self-expression with moving images. Students shoot photographs, digital video and motion picture film to learn the basic principles and techniques of light, composition, camerawork, editing and storytelling. All equipment is provided, including 35mm still cameras, mini-DV video cameras, super 8-film cameras and digital works stations with Apple's Final Cut Express editing program. Those unfamiliar with MAC OS should consider taking "Introduction to Digital" prior to or concurrent with this course. Students pay for film, videotape, and lab costs. Grading is based on student projects and written exams. Please note that there are three variations on this course, each with a slightly different emphasis. Motion Picture Fundamentals: Film and Digital Video gives equal weight to filmmaking and to digital video. In the Filmmaking Emphasis section, students work more film than digital video and the Digital Video Emphasis section, students work with more digital video than film. However, students are exposed to all media in all sections.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA1004
    INTERNATIONAL FILM HISTORY |

    FVMA1004
    INTERNATIONAL FILM HISTORY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course puts into perspective the birth, development, and evolution of the foreign film, concentrating on the influence of political, literary and theatrical traditions, culture and Hollywood on film art from individual nations. Topics covered will include technical and stylistic advances in the German and French silent cinemas, the theory and practice of montage in Soviet films, French cinema of the 1930's, Italian neo-realism, the auteur theory, films of the new wave and contemporary European, Asian and third world cinemas. Grading is based on written exams, class participation and attendance at screenings. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA1006
    SUPER-8 & 16 MM FILM PRODUCTION |

    FVMA1006
    SUPER-8 & 16 MM FILM PRODUCTION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to develop proficiency in the standard procedures of filmmaking and the use of equipment. Students participate in shooting two 16mm films, editing and building soundtracks. Basic aspects of cinematography, lighting, sound and editing are covered, including the use if 16mm camera, sound equipment and digital editing software (Final Cut Pro). Student projects are viewed and critiqued in class. Outside work is necessary for planning shooting, and editing. All equipment is provided, but students pay for their own film and lab expenses. Grading is based on each student's films, exams on technical basics and class participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    FVMA1001

  • FVMA1007
    ELEMENTS OF FILM |

    FVMA1007
    ELEMENTS OF FILM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the critical viewing and understanding of film as an art form. Students learn the vocabulary necessary to analyze film. The function of various film elements is discussed and examples are shown in class from narrative feature films, animation, documentaries and experimental films. Students develop the skills necessary to view, appreciate, understand and discuss film as a complex art, capable of multiple modes of expression and meaning. Grading is based on written exams, homework, and attendance. Outside viewing may be required. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA1010
    INTRO TO FILM THEORY & CRITICISM |

    FVMA1010
    INTRO TO FILM THEORY & CRITICISM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the major aesthetic and theoretical issues encountered in film theory and practice. In this introduction to film criticism, students will examine aesthetic and cultural issues as a background to film theory, study the major figures and issues in the field and make connections to related media and cultural analysis. The course will be organized as a reading and lecture experience. Readings should be done in advance and brought to class. The lectures will provide a broad background for the reading, discussing some particular points from the readings in detail. Grading is based on one written exam, one written analysis and class participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA2025
    DIRECTING MOTION PICTURES |

    FVMA2025
    DIRECTING MOTION PICTURES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Basics of designing and directing scenes for motion pictures are addressed in this course. Some of the problems discussed include the relationship of film to reality, the meaning of cinematic techniques, continuity, shot selection, cut selection and visualization techniques. The format is a combination of lecture, screening, and interactive group exercises. Students participate in analyzing and reworking scenes from well-known films. Extensive outside work is necessary, including attending current films, to discuss directorial issues. Grading is based on written exams, practical exercises, homework and class participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    FVMA1001

  • FVMA2028
    INTRO TO SCREENWRITING |

    FVMA2028
    INTRO TO SCREENWRITING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    As an introduction to writing for film and video, this course combines theory, analysis and practical exercise. Screenwriting basics are covered including story, structure, scene, character, dialogue and action. Students develop stories, scenes and characters and examine the ways in which these elements can be combines in a screenplay. Writing for documentaries is also discussed. Students are required to see selected current films for discussion. Considerable outside work is necessary. Grading is based on the quality of the writing assignments and class participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FVMA3034
    PRODUCING MOTION PICTURES |

    FVMA3034
    PRODUCING MOTION PICTURES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces you to the role of the producer, an important and misunderstood role in the filmmaking process. Throughout the semester, you will explore producing in the making of features, television, corporate projects, and documentaries. Topics covered in class and in guest lectures include fundraising, budgeting, assembling crews, distribution options, and legal and ethical considerations.Grading is based on quality of work produced, one exam, and class participation.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GCDN1025
    FUND. OF ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING |

    GCDN1025
    FUND. OF ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will prepare students not majoring in graphic design to work in a creative team environment toward the production of digital communication materials and graphics, and will introduce students to the web as a design vehicle for publishing and advertising.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ISTC2008
    INTRO TO CYBERSPACE |

    ISTC2008
    INTRO TO CYBERSPACE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the student to the world of the Internet. The course will focus on the effective and efficient use of the Internet to find and evaluate quality resources, communicate and collaborate using appropriate tools, create HTML files, and examine issues such as privacy, security and safety. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ISTC1005

  • MRKT2021
    MARKETING MANAGEMENT(ADMG2021) |

    MRKT2021
    MARKETING MANAGEMENT(ADMG2021) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A basic study of marketing systems in the American economy. This course includes, identifying the activities involved in the flow of goods among manufacturers, brokers, wholesalers, retailers and consumers. The nature of demand, buyer behavior, costs and pricing, sales strategies, promotions and techniques are presented.Cross-listed with ADMG2021|

    PREREQUISITES: