Degrees and Requirements

Child and Family Studies

Bachelor of Arts

 The Child and Family Studies major focuses on human development within the context of families, communities, and the wider society, and an understanding of challenges and treatment options for families in distress. The major is interdisciplinary in nature, with a core foundation in psychology as well as perspectives from education and the social sciences.To successfully complete the Child and Family Studies major, the following coursework is required:

  • 45 credits of Major Requirements
  • 37 credits of Core Requirements
  • 38 credits of General Electives

This major cannot be doubled with a major or minor in Psychology.

Summary of Requirements

Major Requirements: 45 Credits

  • CFST2010
    SURVEY OF HELPING PROFESSIONS & FAMILY POLICY |

    CFST2010
    SURVEY OF HELPING PROFESSIONS & FAMILY POLICY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide an overview of policies and legislation that directly impact the functioning of parents and their children in the U.S. Some of the topics to be covered include changes in the welfare system, aid to dependent children, immigration policies, and availability of health care.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021

  • CFST3025
    CONTEMPORARY FAMILY STYLES |

    CFST3025
    CONTEMPORARY FAMILY STYLES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines marriage and family systems across the lifespan from the perspective of human development. It introduces students to historical perspectives on families, as well as the diversity of emergent family styles, including single parenthood, cohabitation, divorce, and remarriage in the context of the latest psychological research.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 & PSYC2022 or PSYC2040

  • CFST4051

    CFST4051

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CFST4052

    CFST4052

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CFST4055
    SENIOR SEMINAR |

    CFST4055
    SENIOR SEMINAR |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This seminar will be conducted during the student's semester of field experience. Students will explore intervention approaches and techniques in working with families and children, along with strategies for identifying one's values and ethics in working with those in need. Students will conduct critical assessments of the functioning of the agencies in which they are placed, as well as increasing their awareness of professional roles and responsibilities in the helping profession.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSCY3011 & SR only

  • EDSP2015
    INTRO TO HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES, ACCOMODATIONS, & ADAPTATIONS|

    EDSP2015
    INTRO TO HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES, ACCOMODATIONS, & ADAPTATIONS|

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides students an opportunity to explore foundations of special education in the United States including: characteristics of each disability category, legislation, over-representation of diverse students, academic and functional needs of students with disabilities, individual learning differences, least restrictive environment, implications for a Standards Aligned System, collaboration and transition. Students will develop an understanding of Accommodations and Adaptations for inclusive environments.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2030
    TECHNICAL WRITING |

    ENGL2030
    TECHNICAL WRITING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Designed to apply the basic principles of communication to technical information so that the student can learn to present complex technical messages in the clearest possible way.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012(H)

  • PSYC1021
    INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY |

    PSYC1021
    INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This survey course introduces students to several critical areas of psychology. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on the scientific method, its application to psychology, and the insights gained from scientific research. The interactions among biological processes, cognitive and emotional responses, sociocultural forces, and behavior are examined. Included are such diverse topics as: health, stress, and coping; consciousness, sleep and dreams; effects of psychoactive drugs on behavior and health; psychological disorders; social psychology; types of learning and behavior management, information processing approaches including memory, encoding and retrieval; and the relationship of the nervous system to thought, feelings, and behaviors.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PSYC2022
    CHILD DEVELOPMENT |

    PSYC2022
    CHILD DEVELOPMENT |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the field of developmental science with emphasis on the period from conception through middle childhood. The course approaches development by making use of both historical and contemporary scientific theory and investigates the major domains of development--biological, cognitive, social and emotional-from a chronological perspective.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

  • PSYC2040
    ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT |

    PSYC2040
    ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional developmental changes occurring during adolescence. Attention will be given to the contexts in which development occurs: the family, school, and peer group-as well as psychological changes in identity, autonomy, and intimacy. Psychological disorders that manifest during adolescence will be examined. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

  • PSYC3011
    RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY |

    PSYC3011
    RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the major experimental designs and methods of scientific psychology. The nature of psychology as a science, types of and evaluation of research design and conclusions, conducting of research, preparation of research papers and ethics in research in psychology are covered.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 & PSYC3070 or CRIM2011 & MATH1040 or CRIM2012

  • PSYC3023
    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY |

    PSYC3023
    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course begins with definitions of abnormal behavior. Most of the course focuses upon various classifications of abnormality based on the most recent DSM, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, somatoform disorders, stress and physical health, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance use disorders, sexual and gender-identity disorders, and schizophrenia. Etiology, symptomatology, and treatment are explored throughout the semester. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

  • PSYC3032
    PSYCH OF ADULTHOOD & AGING |

    PSYC3032
    PSYCH OF ADULTHOOD & AGING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the years from emerging adulthood through the end of life from a development are explored, with attention given to qualitative and quantitative approaches. Theories of change throughout the life course are investigated, as well as normative changes in physical health, cognition, work life, personality, and intimacy. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

  • PSYC3040
    COUNSELING THEORIES & METHODS I |

    PSYC3040
    COUNSELING THEORIES & METHODS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is the first course in a two-course counseling sequence. Taken together, these two courses are designed to: a) familiarize students with the basic concepts in the field of counseling; b) introduce students to the major theoretical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy; and c) enable students to develop a level of counseling skill that will enable them to function effectively in a supervised setting. This first semester is more than 50% abstract (lecture/discussion) learning.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

  • PSYC3041
    COUNSELING THEORIES & METHODS II |

    PSYC3041
    COUNSELING THEORIES & METHODS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is the second course in a two-course counseling sequence. Taken together, these two courses are designed to: a) familiarize students with the basic concepts in the field of counseling; b) introduce students to the major theoretical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy; and c) enable students to develop a level of counseling skill that will enable them to function effectively in a supervised setting. This second semester is more than 50% experiential (role-playing; classroom exercise in the use of specific counseling techniques) learning.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC3040