Degrees and Requirements

Applied Communications

A major in the Applied Communications professional degree program is meant for students who have already been working in communication, media and technology related fields and need to finish their college degree for advancement or career growth. The program takes advantage of the prior experience of students by not requiring introductory courses and also accounts for credits received from previous post-secondary education experiences in any field.

REQUIREMENTS:  To successfully complete the Applied Communications major, the following coursework is required:


· 15 credits as listed under Major Component/Requirements
· 15 credits as listed under Major Electives
· 18 credits additional electives in a "focus area" in consultation with the advisor
· 37 CORE credits
· 36 General Electives

A minimum number of 120 credits are required for degree, the last 30 of which must be earned at La Roche University.  (Developmental course work does not count toward the minimum number of required credits for graduation.

Summary of Requirements

Major Courses Required: 15 Credits

  • CMET2003
    COMMUNICATION BETWEEN CULTURES |

    CMET2003
    COMMUNICATION BETWEEN CULTURES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course begins with a focus study on communication factors which affect any cross-cultural interpersonal interaction. The students then survey specific differences between U.S. cultural customs and those of countries presently involved in La Roche's Pacem In Terris Institute. Finally, the role of the media in intercultural relations is discussed.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET2005
    COMMUNICATION THEORY, RESEARCH &CRITICISM |

    CMET2005
    COMMUNICATION THEORY, RESEARCH &CRITICISM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the application of theory and research to mass communication including Internet communication. In addition, the course provides a starting point for students in understanding and creating a critical perspective on mass communication through the lens of specific theoretical perspectives.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET1001 or SLSO1008

  • CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY |

    CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course deals with the evolution of technology and the use of communications technology for business, entertainment and information. Through readings, discussion, group work and hands-on experience the class examines the social, cultural and economic aspects of communication technology.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET3007
    INTRODUCTION TO GAMES STUDIES |

    CMET3007
    INTRODUCTION TO GAMES STUDIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course is an introduction to the significance of games through human history and their evolving role in the digital age. The course will include examining how games are made, logical progressions of play, how games can teach as well as create narrative structures similar to film, television and literature.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET4001
    LEGAL ISSUES OF MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS |

    CMET4001
    LEGAL ISSUES OF MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will examine the of laws and rules affecting various types of mass communication industries in the United States, i.e., broadcasting, cable communication, the Internet, advertising and journalism. The roles of the public, political leaders, research groups, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the First Amendment and the Supreme Court will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives: 15 credits: Choose 5 courses

  • CMET3009
    SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH & ANALYSIS |

    CMET3009
    SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH & ANALYSIS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The goal of this class is to help students understand the significance and meaning of social media to society and culture on both a large scale and on an individual basis. The class will include reading and conducting research on the effectiveness and effects of social media on individuals and on the larger scale of politics, business, education, society and culture. Research methods like surveys and focus groups as well as participant/observation will be used to help students gather data to answer specific questions about the short term and long term effects of social media.The origins, structures and business models of the major social media platforms will be examined along with some of the fringe apps which provide similar services but to smaller, niche audiences. The future of social media, including possible regulations, the changing marketplace, extensive use of artificial intelligence and virtual reality will also be considered. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide the student with a deep understanding of how a wide variety of games are produced by collaborative teams for purposes as varied as entertainment, training, marketing, sales, business and education. Students will be exposed to game logic, games for learning and training, and gamification concepts for a range of activities. Individual and group projects, research, surveys and simulations will all be major parts of the class learning activities. The social, cultural and economic implications and roles of games today and in the future will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET3007

  • ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to stimulate writing in prose and poetry, with emphasis on readings and exercises in craft.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012

  • ENGL3064
    WRITING CREATIVE NONFICTION |

    ENGL3064
    WRITING CREATIVE NONFICTION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course expands upon the material taught in Journalism I, Journalism II, and Readings in Creative Nonfiction by inviting students to produce multiple creative nonfiction pieces about, but not limited to, people, places, things, and personal essays.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL3031

  • FILM1025
    FILM & VISUAL STORYTELLING |

    FILM1025
    FILM & VISUAL STORYTELLING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course provides a basic introduction to the world of film, including a brief history and the technology and tools that have made film possible. The course though is focused primarily on film as the arrangement of images into something we call a story. Together we examine the process of telling stories with moving images - that is how to craft a story in relation to composition, color, sound, and editing. We explore two main film genres, narrative and documentary, and discuss how storytelling is fundamental to them. For narrative film we examine dramatic storytelling aspects such as mise-en-scène, concept, character, theme, plot, and dialog. In documentary film we explore how filmmakers can incorporate strong, often character-driven stories that also have a beginning, middle and end. We look at how they can raise issues with much at stake, offer rising tensions, and still utilize a narrative arc that keeps viewers actively engaged. We look also at experimental/avant-garde films, that is non-narrative forms of filmmaking, which focus on movement, rhythm, and composition, because ideas and techniques from this genre have and continue to influence story-based filmmaking.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS(ADMG2007) |

    MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS(ADMG2007) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A comprehensive study of advertising, detailing its relationship to marketing practice. Topics such as advertising preparation, media evaluation, market research, pricing and retailing problems are included. The role of public relations in an organizational communication program is also explained.Cross-listed with ADMG2007|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING |

    MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Marketers have been using electronic tools for many years, but the Internet and other new electronic technologies have created a flood of interesting and innovative ways to provide customer value. Internet Marketing is traditional marketing using electronic methods. It affects traditional marketing in two ways. First, it increases efficiency in established marketing functions. Secondly, the technology of E-marketing transforms many marketing strategies. The transformation results in new business models that add customer value and may increase company profitability. These new opportunities create many questions that are addressed in this course. How can firms leverage new technologies to maximum benefit? How much commitment should marketers make to Internet marketing programs?|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021