Degrees and Requirements

Bioengineering - Pitt

Dual Degree: Any Bachelor of Arts or Science degree from La Roche with Bachelor of Science in Engineering from University of Pittsburgh.

To successfully complete the terms of the articulation agreement, the following is required:

  • must be enrolled at LRC for at least the past 2 years
  • must have a QPA of 3.5 or higher at time of application to University of Pittsburgh engineering program
  • must receive favorable recommendation from the combined degree progarm liason at LRC
  • must successfully complete all science and math pre-requisite course requirements for their intended engineering  major with a grade of C or better and a GPA of 3.0 or better
    • Foundations: 46 credits
    • Mathematics: 13 credits
    • Chemistry: 4-8 credits
    • Biological Sciences: 16 credits
    • Engineering: 3 credits (taken at University of Pittsburgh)
    • Technical/ Professional electives: 3 credits (choose one course from the list below)
  • must have completed the major requirements prescribed by their LRC program prior to commencing study at the University of Pittsburgh or have a written plan in place to show how these requirements will be met at the University of Pittsburgh

Summary of Requirements

Biological Sciences: 16 credits

  • BIOL1003
    GENERAL BIOLOGY I |

    BIOL1003
    GENERAL BIOLOGY I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A presentation of a comprehensive survey of the major area within modern biology with emphasis placed on unsolved problems and the nature of scientific evidence. The course explores the properties of living matter on the molecular, cellular and organismic level. Open to all science majors and non-science majors with a strong interest in biology or a professional need.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Concurrent: BIOL1005

  • BIOL1004
    GENERAL BIOLOGY II |

    BIOL1004
    GENERAL BIOLOGY II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A presentation of a comprehensive survey of the major area within modern biology with emphasis placed on unsolved problems and the nature of scientific evidence. The course explores the properties of living matter on the molecular, cellular and organismic level. Open to all science majors and non-science majors with a strong interest in biology or a professional need.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1003 & BIOL1005, Concurrent: BIOL1006

  • BIOL1005
    GENERAL BIOLOGY I-LAB |

    BIOL1005
    GENERAL BIOLOGY I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Selected experiments chosen to emphasize principles presented in the General Biology lecture courses.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    coreg: BIOL1003

  • BIOL1006
    GENERAL BIOLOGY II-LAB |

    BIOL1006
    GENERAL BIOLOGY II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Selected experiments chosen to emphasize principles presented in the General Biology lecture courses.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • BIOL2021
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I |

    BIOL2021
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A comparative study of the structural and functional characteristics of vertebrates tracing the evolution of animals from primitive chordates to mammals. Emphasis is placed on the physical and chemical operations of vertebrates and how these operations contribute to homeostasis. Structural/functional relationships are discussed. Lecture and laboratory courses.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006 & Concurrent: BIOL2021L

  • BIOL2021L
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I-LAB |

    BIOL2021L
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 0/0

    Laboratory for BIOL2021: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • BIOL2022
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II |

    BIOL2022
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A comparative study of the structural and functional characteristics of vertebrates tracing the evolution of animals from primitive chordates to mammals. Emphasis is placed on the physical and chemical operations of vertebrates and how these operations contribute to homeostasis. Structural/functional relationships are discussed.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL2021& Concurrent: BIOL2022L

  • BIOL2022L
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II-LAB |

    BIOL2022L
    COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 0/0

    Laboratory for BIOL20222: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology II|

    PREREQUISITES:

Chemistry : 4-8 credits (CHEM2016/L Optional)

  • CHEM2015
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I |

    CHEM2015
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the classification and characterization of organic compounds, their preparation, properties and reactions. The application of modern organic theories to these subjects is stressed. Topics include nomenclature, bond theory, stereochemistry, synthesis, mechanisms, and structure determination by instrumental methods. Lecture and laboratory course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CHEM1002 concurrent: CHEM2015L

  • CHEM2015L
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I-LAB |

    CHEM2015L
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Laboratory for CHEM2015|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CHEM2016
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II |

    CHEM2016
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the classification and characterization of organic compounds, their preparation, properties and reactions. The application of modern organic theories to these subjects is stressed. Topics include nomenclature, bond theory, stereochemistry, synthesis, mechanisms, and structure determination by instrumental methods. Lecture and laboratory course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CHEM2015 concurrent: CHEM2016L

  • CHEM2016L
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II-LAB |

    CHEM2016L
    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab for CHEM2016 Organic Chemistry|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CHEM2015L

Engineering : Taken at University of Pittsburgh

  • ENGR0135

    ENGR0135

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

Foundation Courses (Includes 18 credits of Humanities and Social Science courses): 46 credits

  • CHEM1001
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY I |

    CHEM1001
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the basic principles governing matter, energy and matter-energy interaction. Topics include atomic structure, bonding theory, aggregated states of matter, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Concurrent: CHEM1003

  • CHEM1002
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY II |

    CHEM1002
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the basic principles governing matter, energy and matter-energy interaction. Topics include atomic structure, bonding theory, aggregated states of matter, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Concurrent: CHEM1004

  • CHEM1003
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LAB |

    CHEM1003
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    A series of experiments related to the content of CHEM1001 emphasizing laboratory techniques and familiarization with basic laboratory equipment. Open to all science majors and non-science majors with a strong interest in chemistry or a professional need.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CHEM1004
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LAB |

    CHEM1004
    GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    A series of experiments related to the content of CHEM1002, emphasizing laboratory techniques and familiarization with basic laboratory equipment. Open to all science majors and non-science majors with a strong interest in chemistry or a professional need.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the art of algorithm design and problem solving in the context of computer programming. The basic structure and logic of the Java language is presented. Topics covered include data types and operators, control flow, repetition and loop statements, arrays and pointers. Good programming practices will be taught and encouraged.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1002 or SLSC1005 or SLSC1012 & Concur: CSCI1010L

  • CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab work for CSCI1010 Programming I.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MATH1032
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I |

    MATH1032
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    The first semester of a three-semester integrated course in the elements of analytic geometry and differential and integral calculus. Included are the concept and applications of the derivative of a function of a single variable, differentiation of polynomials and the trigonometric functions, the chain, product and quotient rules, implicit differentiation, and differentials. Concludes with anti-differentiation, integration, area under graphs of functions and applications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1010

  • MATH1033
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALCULUS II |

    MATH1033
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALCULUS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A continuation of MATH1032 including applications of the definite integral, area, arc length, volumes and surface area, centroids, average value and theorem of the mean for definite integrals. Derivatives and integrals of transcendental functions are followed by techniques of integration, L'Hopital's Rule and indeterminate forms and improper integrals. Also included are conic sections and polar coordinates.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032

  • PHYS1032
    GENERAL PHYSICS I |

    PHYS1032
    GENERAL PHYSICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is the first of a three-semester introduction to calculus-based physics stressing experimental and problem-solving techniques. Concepts covered are mechanics, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, gravitation, oscillation, and wave/acoustics.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032, Coreq: PHYS1032L

  • PHYS1032L
    GENERAL PHYSICS I-LAB |

    PHYS1032L
    GENERAL PHYSICS I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Laboratory for PHYS1032 General Physics I|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PHYS1033
    GENERAL PHYSICS II |

    PHYS1033
    GENERAL PHYSICS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The second of a three-semester introduction to calculus-based physics. Concepts covered are thermal properties and electromagnetism: thermo dynamics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic wave, geometrical optics, and physics optics.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PHYS1032, Coreq: PHYS1033L

  • PHYS1033L
    GENERAL PHYSICS II-LAB |

    PHYS1033L
    GENERAL PHYSICS II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Laboratory for PHYS1033 General Physics II|

    PREREQUISITES:

Mathematics: 13 credits

  • MATH2030
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALC III |

    MATH2030
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALC III |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A continuation of MATH1033 including a study of vectors, parametric equations, solid analytic geometry and functions of several variables. Includes partial differentiation, total differentials, multiple integrals and surface and line integrals, the theorems of Gauss and Stokes, and infinite series.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1033

  • MATH2031
    ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS |

    MATH2031
    ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of first and second order differential equations, infinite series, Laplace transforms and power series together with existence of solution and uniqueness theorems.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH2030

  • MATH3015
    LINEAR ALGEBRA |

    MATH3015
    LINEAR ALGEBRA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A development of the theory of vector spaces from linear equations, matrices and determinants. Topics include linear independence, bases, dimensions, linear mappings, orthogonal reduction, diagonalization of matrices using eigenvectors and eigenvalues.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MATH3040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS I |

    MATH3040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A calculus-based first course in probability and statistics for science and honors students. Various discrete and continuous probability distributions will be examined including the binomial, multinomial, Poisson, uniform, exponential, gamma and normal distributions. Mathematical expectation, moment generating functions, linear combinations of random variables, sampling distributions, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression, correlation and the method of least squares will also be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Technical/ Professional Electives: Pre-Approved

  • BIOL2025
    MICROBIOLOGY |

    BIOL2025
    MICROBIOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    An examination of the morphology and physiology of microorganisms with emphasis on their relationship to their environment. Topics include food, water, soil, industrial, and medical microbiology, microbial genetics, and microbial diversity. The laboratory work introduces the student to both the organisms and the techniques necessary to study them. Lecture and laboratory course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006

  • BIOL2025L
    MICROBIOLOGY-LAB |

    BIOL2025L
    MICROBIOLOGY-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 0/0

    Laboratory for BIOL2025 Microbiology |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • BIOL3013
    GENETICS |

    BIOL3013
    GENETICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the basic principles of heredity including Mendelian, molecular and population genetics. Topics will include the cellular functions that give rise to inherited traits, the genetic basis for evolution, the role of genetics in biotechnology, and the statistical basis for predicting the probability of inheriting certain traits.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006

  • BIOL3015
    GENERAL ECOLOGY |

    BIOL3015
    GENERAL ECOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A general ecology course studying ecosystem and population dynamics. Application of these concepts is made to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems including current environmental problems. Fieldwork is an integral part of this course. Lecture and laboratory course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004

  • BIOL3026
    CELL BIOLOGY |

    BIOL3026
    CELL BIOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey course in cell biology. The ultra structure of the Eukaryotic plant and animal cell are examined and related to cell function. Special emphasis is placed on membrane structure and functions.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006

  • BIOL3036
    BIOCHEMISTRY I (CHEM3036) |

    BIOL3036
    BIOCHEMISTRY I (CHEM3036) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introduction to the biochemical metabolism of the living cell. Cellular structure, macromolecules, metabolic pathways, energy transformations, regulatory mechanisms and molecular genetics are discussed. Cross-listed with CHEM3036 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    CHEM2015

  • BIOL4019
    IMMUNOLOGY |

    BIOL4019
    IMMUNOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course involves the description and development of the immune system, which includes the chemical, molecular, and cellular basis of immune reactions. The genetic and chemical control of the immune response is a recurrent theme of the course. Major topics covered in the course include specific immunities, types of hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, transplantation and rejection and immune disorders and deficiencies.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006 & CHEM1002

  • BIOL4030
    MOLECULAR BIOLOGY |

    BIOL4030
    MOLECULAR BIOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Molecular Biology is an introduction to the study of selected biological processes from a molecular perspective. Both eukaryotes and prokaryotes will be included. The molecular basis of the biosynthesis of macromolecules, intercellular and intracellular communication, genetics, immunology, infectious diseases and cancer will be discussed.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    BIOL1004 & BIOL1006 & CHEM2016 & CHEM2016L

  • CSCI2010
    PROGRAMMING II |

    CSCI2010
    PROGRAMMING II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a follow-on to Programming I. Topics covered include; data structures, file input and output, and other advanced object-oriented programming concepts found in Java.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1010

  • CSCI2010L
    PROGRAMMING II-LAB |

    CSCI2010L
    PROGRAMMING II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab work for CSCI2010 Programming II|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1010 & CSCI1010L & Concur: CSCI2010

  • CSCI2020
    ALGORITHM ANALYSIS |

    CSCI2020
    ALGORITHM ANALYSIS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course teaches techniques of programming utilizing data structures such as lists, stacks, and queues and algorithmic approaches such as recursion, searching and sorting. These techniques are learned through programming exercises as well as classroom study.N×|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2010

  • CSCI2025
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING |

    CSCI2025
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will introduce the students to the important systems language,C,and to several topics related to the hardware and software environment. These are issues related to system interfaces and software synchronization provided by operating systems, the linkage of operating system services to application software, and the fundamental mechanisms for computer communications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2010 & Concur: CSCI2025L

  • CSCI2025L
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING-LAB |

    CSCI2025L
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    This course will provide the hands-on laboratory component to the Systems Programming course which will introduce the students to the important systems language,C,and to several topics related to the hardware and software environment. These are issues related to system interfaces and software synchronization provided by the operating system, the linkage of operating system services to application software, and the fundamental mechanisms for computer communications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CSCI2055
    DATABASE-SYSTEMS THEORY |

    CSCI2055
    DATABASE-SYSTEMS THEORY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to present the essential concepts, principles, techniques, and mechanisms for the design, analysis, use, and implementation of computerized database systems. Key information management concepts and techniques are examined: database modeling and representation; information interfaces - access, query, and manipulation, implementation structures, and issues of distribution. The database and information management system technology examined in this course represents the state-of-the-art, including traditional approaches as well as recent research developments. The course should allow the student to understand, use, and build practical database systems. The course is intended to provide a basic understanding of the issues and problems involved in database systems, a knowledge of current practical techniques for satisfying the needs of such a system, and an indication of the current research approaches that are likely to provide a basis for tomorrow's solutions.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1010

  • CSCI3040
    OPERATING SYSTEMS |

    CSCI3040
    OPERATING SYSTEMS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an in-depth study of modern operating systems. Students will learn about the services provided by an operating system, how to use these services and how the services are implemented. Topics covered include: Initialization (boot), Processes, Controlling shared resources, Memory, Bulk storage systems, and Network Communications (TCP/IP) as they relate to the computer operating system.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2035

  • CSCI4045
    COMPUTER NETWORKS & DISTRIBUTED APPLICATIONS |

    CSCI4045
    COMPUTER NETWORKS & DISTRIBUTED APPLICATIONS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the fundamentals of computer networking for distributed applications. Topics covered include network architecture, protocols, standards, security and socket programming. The course provides students with the ability to create programs making appropriate use of networked architectures with a specific focus on the Internet.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2025

  • CSCI4055
    ADVANCED DATABASE THEORY |

    CSCI4055
    ADVANCED DATABASE THEORY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a continuation of Database-Systems Theory. It concentrates on object-oriented database design, object relational design, data warehousing, data marts, and data mining. Emphasis will be placed on modeling languages such as UML, ODMG, as well as ODL and SQL3 standards. Also, Online Analytical Processing and its relationship to data warehousing, data mining, and decision support systems will be discussed.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2055

  • MATH2050
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I |

    MATH2050
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A basic course dealing with mathematics applicable to computer science. It provides an introduction to mathematical methods and covers such topics as: enumeration, set theory, mathematical logic, proof techniques, number systems, functions and relations, graphs and digraphs, trees, combinitorics, basic algebraic structures, recurrence relations, Boolean algebra, and analysis of algorithms.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032

  • MATH2051
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS II |

    MATH2051
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A continuation of MATH1014. Topics to be covered will include some or all of the following: integers and integers Mod n; counting techniques, combinatorics, and discrete probability; graphs, trees, and relations; Boolean algebras; and models of computation such as grammars, finite-state machines, and Turing machines.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH2050

  • MATH3045
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS II |

    MATH3045
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A detailed study of topics in statistics: comparison of classical and Bavesian methods in conditional probability and estimation of parametrics, non-linear regression, multiple, partial and rank correlation, indices, time series, analyses of variance for two-way classification with and without interaction, design of experiments, reliability and validity of measurements and non-parametric tests.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH3040

  • MATH4003
    HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS |

    MATH4003
    HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey course in the development of modern mathematics. Beginning with the rudimentary mathematical concepts developed in prehistoric times, mathematics grew sometimes slowly and sometimes rapidly with the insights of various cultures. In this course we trace this development through ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, classical Greece, Arabic and Hindu cultures of the Dark and Middle Ages, the European Renaissance and on into the modern times. Special attention will be paid to major developments such as the emergence of mathematics as an organized, reasoned and independent discipline in Classical Greece; the emergence and development of major areas of mathematics such as of algebra, trigonometry, productive geometry, calculus, analytic geometry infinite series, non-Euclidean geometry; and how developments in mathematical thought have shaped the modern world.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH2031

  • MATH4015
    MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA |

    MATH4015
    MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introduction to algebraic concepts such as groups, rings, integral domains and fields. The elementary number systems occupy a central place. Mappings, especially homorphisms, are introduced early and emphasized through out the course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MATH4020
    GEOMETRY |

    MATH4020
    GEOMETRY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of geometry in the light of modern trends with attention to axiomatic structure, including an introduction to hyperbolic and elliptic figures as geometric structures together with an overview of projective geometry.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH2030

  • MATH4035
    REAL ANALYSIS |

    MATH4035
    REAL ANALYSIS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introductory to classical (real) analysis. Includes a rigorous treatment of logic, set theory, functions, countable and uncountable sets, the real number system, metric spaces, sequences, series, differentiation and integration.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH2031