Degrees and Requirements

Software Engineering - Gannon

The Software Engineering program is a dual degree program with Gannon University.  Students will earn a degree in their chosen major at La Roche University along with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Gannon University.

 

To successfully complete the terms of the dual degree articulation agreement, the following is required:

  • Must combine the requirements of this guide with a LRU major
  • Must achieve an overall QPA of 3.0 or higher at time of articulation to Gannon University engineering program
  • Must successfully complete all math, physics and computer science pre-requisite courses listed in this guide with a C grade or better and a GPA of 3.0 or better
  • Must receive favorable recommendation from the LRU sciences faculty committee and Dean of Students to ensure that all academic and conduct standards are met

Summary of Requirements

Liberal Arts Courses : 12 credits

  • PHIL1020
    LOGIC |

    PHIL1020
    LOGIC |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to help the student understand the methods and principles necessary for correct reasoning. The correct use of reason is indispensable for written and spoken communication. The course deals with language and its uses, fallacies, propositions, syllogisms, inference, probability and scientific hypothesis.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PHIL2026
    ETHICS(SLRS1013) |

    PHIL2026
    ETHICS(SLRS1013) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey of historical and contemporary responses to significant moral problems encountered in the Christian life. Topics include conscience, racism, peace and war, ecology, population control, economic justice and capital punishment. Cross-listed with SLRS1013|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • RELS1002
    NEW TESTAMENT(SLRS1011) |

    RELS1002
    NEW TESTAMENT(SLRS1011) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A general introduction to the New Testament and overview of the historical, religious and cultural milieu in which these Scriptures originated. Cross-listed with SLRS1011|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • RELS1003
    WORLD RELIGIONS(SLRS1003) |

    RELS1003
    WORLD RELIGIONS(SLRS1003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the historical development together with the religious beliefs and practices of the major religions of the world including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Zoroastrianism. The teachings of each religion regarding the Absolute, the world, the nature of humans, the problem facing humans, the solution of the problem for humans, Community and Ethics, Rituals and Symbols, and what happens after death will be studied. The course also includes an examination of the beginnings of religion in human history as well as the characteristics of tribal and national religions. Cross-listed with SLRS1003. Class starts the week of 09/10/2018|

    PREREQUISITES:

Mathematics and Science Component: 38 credits

  • CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the art of algorithm design and problem solving in the context of computer programming. The basic structure and logic of the Java language is presented. Topics covered include data types and operators, control flow, repetition and loop statements, arrays and pointers. Good programming practices will be taught and encouraged.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1002 or SLSC1005 or SLSC1012 & Concur: CSCI1010L

  • CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab work for CSCI1010 Programming I.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CSCI2010
    PROGRAMMING II |

    CSCI2010
    PROGRAMMING II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a follow-on to Programming I. Topics covered include; data structures, file input and output, and other advanced object-oriented programming concepts found in Java.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1010

  • CSCI2010L
    PROGRAMMING II-LAB |

    CSCI2010L
    PROGRAMMING II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab work for CSCI2010 Programming II|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1010 & CSCI1010L & Concur: CSCI2010

  • CSCI2025
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING |

    CSCI2025
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will introduce the students to the important systems language,C,and to several topics related to the hardware and software environment. These are issues related to system interfaces and software synchronization provided by operating systems, the linkage of operating system services to application software, and the fundamental mechanisms for computer communications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI2010 & Concur: CSCI2025L

  • CSCI2025L
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING-LAB |

    CSCI2025L
    SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    This course will provide the hands-on laboratory component to the Systems Programming course which will introduce the students to the important systems language,C,and to several topics related to the hardware and software environment. These are issues related to system interfaces and software synchronization provided by the operating system, the linkage of operating system services to application software, and the fundamental mechanisms for computer communications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MATH1032
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I |

    MATH1032
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    The first semester of a three-semester integrated course in the elements of analytic geometry and differential and integral calculus. Included are the concept and applications of the derivative of a function of a single variable, differentiation of polynomials and the trigonometric functions, the chain, product and quotient rules, implicit differentiation, and differentials. Concludes with anti-differentiation, integration, area under graphs of functions and applications.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1010

  • MATH1033
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALCULUS II |

    MATH1033
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALCULUS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A continuation of MATH1032 including applications of the definite integral, area, arc length, volumes and surface area, centroids, average value and theorem of the mean for definite integrals. Derivatives and integrals of transcendental functions are followed by techniques of integration, L'Hopital's Rule and indeterminate forms and improper integrals. Also included are conic sections and polar coordinates.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032

  • MATH2030
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALC III |

    MATH2030
    ANALYTIC GEOMETRY & CALC III |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    A continuation of MATH1033 including a study of vectors, parametric equations, solid analytic geometry and functions of several variables. Includes partial differentiation, total differentials, multiple integrals and surface and line integrals, the theorems of Gauss and Stokes, and infinite series.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1033

  • MATH2050
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I |

    MATH2050
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A basic course dealing with mathematics applicable to computer science. It provides an introduction to mathematical methods and covers such topics as: enumeration, set theory, mathematical logic, proof techniques, number systems, functions and relations, graphs and digraphs, trees, combinitorics, basic algebraic structures, recurrence relations, Boolean algebra, and analysis of algorithms.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032

  • MATH3040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS I |

    MATH3040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A calculus-based first course in probability and statistics for science and honors students. Various discrete and continuous probability distributions will be examined including the binomial, multinomial, Poisson, uniform, exponential, gamma and normal distributions. Mathematical expectation, moment generating functions, linear combinations of random variables, sampling distributions, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression, correlation and the method of least squares will also be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PHYS1032
    GENERAL PHYSICS I |

    PHYS1032
    GENERAL PHYSICS I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is the first of a three-semester introduction to calculus-based physics stressing experimental and problem-solving techniques. Concepts covered are mechanics, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, gravitation, oscillation, and wave/acoustics.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1032, Coreq: PHYS1032L

  • PHYS1032L
    GENERAL PHYSICS I-LAB |

    PHYS1032L
    GENERAL PHYSICS I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Laboratory for PHYS1032 General Physics I|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PHYS1033
    GENERAL PHYSICS II |

    PHYS1033
    GENERAL PHYSICS II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The second of a three-semester introduction to calculus-based physics. Concepts covered are thermal properties and electromagnetism: thermo dynamics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic wave, geometrical optics, and physics optics.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PHYS1032, Coreq: PHYS1033L

  • PHYS1033L
    GENERAL PHYSICS II-LAB |

    PHYS1033L
    GENERAL PHYSICS II-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Laboratory for PHYS1033 General Physics II|

    PREREQUISITES:

Required in LRC major core: 6 credits

  • PHIL1021
    INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY(SLRS1012) |

    PHIL1021
    INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY(SLRS1012) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is a survey course that presents the principal philosophical problems, questions, and systems. Consideration is given to representative schools of philosophy, especially the foundational teachings in Plato and Aristotle. The relationship of philosophy to other disciplines, arts and sciences is examined.Cross-listed with SLRS1012|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLHS1003
    HISTORY OF THE WORLD |

    SLHS1003
    HISTORY OF THE WORLD |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Students will examine the historical development of the world. Although the pre-modern period of history will be addressed, particular emphasis will be placed on the modern period and how industrialization has affected both developed and developing regions of the world. Special attention will also be given to methodologies related to historical anthropology, as well as economic, social, cultural and intellectual history. Questions of race, class and gender will be interwoven with an awareness of global diversity and multi-culturalism. |

    PREREQUISITES: