Degrees and Requirements

Film

The film program provides students with a well-rounded education emphasizing the aesthetic, social and cultural aspects of film. Students will apply theoretical and comparative concepts of film analysis as they create their own films throughout the program, moving through training in all stages of film production and exploring the most recent technological advances in visual media. In line with the College’s Mission, utmost importance is placed on an education that will ultimately empower graduates to effectively use film and visual storytelling as a means to shape culture and affect positive change in society. 

Students are encouraged to add a minor in one of several related disciplines, including Photography, Game Studies, Marketing, or further concentrate their interests in film analysis or through innovative approaches to filmmaking.


REQUIREMENTS: To successfully complete the Film Studies major, the following coursework is required:
• 49 credits as listed under “Major Course Requirements
• 15 credits as listed under Major Electives 

(Major electives can be fulfilled all or in part by minors in Marketing, Photography, or Game Studies.)

• 37 CORE credits
• 19 General Electives

•A minimum number of 120 credits are required for degree, the last 30 of which must be earned at La Roche University.
 

Summary of Requirements

Major Course Requirements: 49 credits

  • CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION(SLSO1008) |

    CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION(SLSO1008) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course the student examines human, verbal, non-verbal and visual communication. Through an interactive classroom the student will combine the theory and definitions of the text with their experience to clarify and understand the concepts that make up human communication. In the classroom, writing, making presentations, working in groups, solving problems and applying creativity to the concepts of communication will be some of the ways the students learn and reinforce the subject matter. Written papers, research and computer-mediated-communication further reinforce the concepts of the course and serve as a means of evaluation of the student's understanding and absorption of the material. Cross-listed with SLSOC1008|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY |

    CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course deals with the evolution of technology and the use of communications technology for business, entertainment and information. Through readings, discussion, group work and hands-on experience the class examines the social, cultural and economic aspects of communication technology.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN & MEDIA |

    CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN & MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a broad examination of mass media as message design with an emphasis on understanding the visual, aural and contextual aspects of a variety of communications media such as: film, video, print media, outdoor advertising and web pages. Elements of control in message design, as well as conceptual frameworks in popular culture, will he addressed from still and moving images, to sound, color, texture and text. Message Design will prepare students entering fields of media production to under-stand the inherent meaning of every element of mass media construction.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to stimulate writing in prose and poetry, with emphasis on readings and exercises in craft.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM1020

    FILM1020

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM1025

    FILM1025

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2010

    FILM2010

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2015

    FILM2015

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1025

  • FILM2020

    FILM2020

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2030

    FILM2030

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1020

  • FILM3015

    FILM3015

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM2030

  • FILM4010

    FILM4010

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM3015

  • FILM4051

    FILM4051

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM4055

    FILM4055

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY |

    GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will explore digital capture and handling of photographs enabling the student to master the technical aspects of digital image capture. Students will learn techniques for editing and enhancing photographs, become familiar with photography’s various roles: art form, journalism, advertising and will produce a portfolio of quality color and black and white prints from digital files. This course is for design majors only.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SASUxxxx

    SASUxxxx

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3025
    SOCIAL CHANGE & DEVELOPMENT |

    SOCL3025
    SOCIAL CHANGE & DEVELOPMENT |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The exploratory study of social change and its impact on the social institutions of contemporary society. The course examines various theories, processes and areas of social change and presents an overview of the social effects of modernization on non-industrialized societies.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Courses Required: 15 Credits

  • GCDN4028

    GCDN4028

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN3012

Major Electives: 15 credits

  • CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION |

    CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The subject matter of this course is the history and development of mass communication. The course will include examining the origin, economics, technology, mode of communication, communication effectiveness, social role and future of a variety of communication media including: newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film and computer-mediated-communication.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET1001 or SLSO1008

  • CMET3007
    INTRO TO GAMES STUDIES |

    CMET3007
    INTRO TO GAMES STUDIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course is an introduction to the significance of games through human history and their evolving role in the digital age. The course will include examining how games are made, logical progressions of play, how games can teach as well as create narrative structures similar to film, television and literature.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE & SOCIETY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide the student with a deep understanding of how a wide variety of games are produced by collaborative teams for purposes as varied as entertainment, training, marketing, sales, business and education. Students will be exposed to game logic, games for learning and training, and gamification concepts for a range of activities. Individual and group projects, research, surveys and simulations will all be major parts of the class learning activities. The social, cultural and economic implications and roles of games today and in the future will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET3007

  • ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING |

    ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to teach students how to write advertising copy that targets various audiences and employs multiple venues: print, radio, TV, and the internet. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012(H)

  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST & SOCIAL MEDIA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012

  • FILM2035

    FILM2035

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    JR/SR only

  • FILM2040

    FILM2040

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1020

  • GCDN2042

    GCDN2042

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2016

  • GCDN3012

    GCDN3012

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2042

  • GCDN3040

    GCDN3040

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2016

  • MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS (ADMG2007) |

    MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS (ADMG2007) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A comprehensive study of advertising, detailing its relationship to marketing practice. Topics such as advertising preparation, media evaluation, market research, pricing and retailing problems are included. The role of public relations in an organizational communication program is also explained.Cross-listed with ADMG2007|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT3012
    BUYER BEHAVIOR |

    MRKT3012
    BUYER BEHAVIOR |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on the role of buyers in the marketing process. Buyer behavior in the consumer marketplace as well as the organizational buying process is examined. The study of buying behaviors enhances understanding of what marketing strategies are likely to be effective, how humans operate in the marketplace, and what kind of affective, cognitive, and social mechanisms enter into the purchasing decision. A sampling of specific topics addressed includes the role of attitudes, learning and memory, and lifestyles and culture in the buying decision.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT3033
    MARKETING RESEARCH |

    MRKT3033
    MARKETING RESEARCH |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Explores the function which links the consumer, customer, and public to the marketer through information -- information used to identify and define marketing opportunities and problems; generate, refine, and evaluate marketing actions; and, monitor marketing performance. This course deals with the planning for, collection, and analysis of data relevant to marketing decision-making and the communication of the results of this analysis to management.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MRKT3012

  • MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING |

    MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Marketers have been using electronic tools for many years, but the Internet and other new electronic technologies have created a flood of interesting and innovative ways to provide customer value. Internet Marketing is traditional marketing using electronic methods. It affects traditional marketing in two ways. First, it increases efficiency in established marketing functions. Secondly, the technology of E-marketing transforms many marketing strategies. The transformation results in new business models that add customer value and may increase company profitability. These new opportunities create many questions that are addressed in this course. How can firms leverage new technologies to maximum benefit? How much commitment should marketers make to Internet marketing programs?|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT4014
    MARKETING STRATEGY |

    MRKT4014
    MARKETING STRATEGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A capstone course in marketing that emphasizes planning at the management level. Examines key concepts and issues that impact planning decisions, such as analysis of the marketing environment; formulation of marketing strategies; and development, implementation, and control of the marketing program. Using case studies, students are expected to develop comprehensive marketing plans and recommended solutions to specific situations encountered by marketing professionals operating in a wide variety of organizations.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MRKT3012

  • SLDD1001
    COMING OF AGE: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    SLDD1001
    COMING OF AGE: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Coming of Age, we do not mean all stories with children and adolescents in them. In fact, for any film or piece of literature to fit our course, it must show a change, sometimes call a Rite of Passage, by at least one main youthful character into a new adult/mature role and/or identity. This can be either fiction or non-fiction. The character(s) may face challenges, for example, of responsibility, danger, and/or romance. The age of the character may be from childhood into early adulthood. So it's yes to Peter Pan and Holes but no to Cocoon.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1002
    FANTASY: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    SLDD1002
    FANTASY: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Fantasy, we do not mean all things that are Fictional or Adventurous. Most Fiction is actually very realistic, and so is not Fantasy.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1003
    MYSTERY: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    SLDD1003
    MYSTERY: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTHETICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Mystery, we do not mean any fiction about a crime and/or has some unresolved element(s) to it but those Mysteries that involve fictional detectives, criminals, and the investigative methods.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTETHICS |

    SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM & LITERATURE(DD) LIT & AESTETHICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By "War", we do not mean any tale that has some conflict, fighting, or battle in it. These stories must be fictional or creative non-fiction (not a history textbook, for example)|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM |

    SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce non-majors to literary study through viewing film adaptations of Shakespeare in conjunction with reading the printed texts. By examining the relationship between the texts of the plays and their film interpretations, students will also be able to examine and analyze dramatic genres central to literary study and the study of Shakespeare: tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances.|

    PREREQUISITES: