Degrees and Requirements

Film

The film program provides students with a well-rounded education emphasizing the aesthetic, social and cultural aspects of film. Students will apply theoretical and comparative concepts of film analysis as they create their own films throughout the program, moving through training in all stages of film production and exploring the most recent technological advances in visual media. In line with the University’s Mission, utmost importance is placed on an education that will ultimately empower graduates to effectively use film and visual storytelling as a means to shape culture and affect positive change in society. 

Students are encouraged to add a minor in one of several related disciplines, including Photography, Game Studies, Marketing, or further concentrate their interests in film analysis or through innovative approaches to filmmaking

REQUIREMENTS: To successfully complete the Film Studies major, the following coursework is required:

  • 49 credits as listed under Major Course Requirements
  • 15 credits as listed under Major Electives 

(Major electives can be fulfilled all or in part by minors in Marketing, Photography, or Game Studies.)

  • 37 CORE credits
  • 19 General Electives

A minimum number of 120 credits are required for degree, the last 30 of which must be earned at La Roche University.

Summary of Requirements

Major Course Requirements: 49 credits

  • CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION (SLSO1008)

    CMET1001
    HUMAN COMMUNICATION (SLSO1008)

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course the student examines human, verbal, non-verbal and visual communication. Through an interactive classroom the student will combine the theory and definitions of the text with their experience to clarify and understand the concepts that make up human communication. In the classroom, writing, making presentations, working in groups, solving problems and applying creativity to the concepts of communication will be some of the ways the students learn and reinforce the subject matter. Written papers, research and computer-mediated-communication further reinforce the concepts of the course and serve as a means of evaluation of the student's understanding and absorption of the material. Cross-listed with SLSOC1008 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    CMET3002
    NEW MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course deals with the evolution of technology and the use of communications technology for business, entertainment and information. Through readings, discussion, group work and hands-on experience the class examines the social, cultural and economic aspects of communication technology.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN AND MEDIA

    CMET3005
    MESSAGE DESIGN AND MEDIA

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a broad examination of mass media as message design with an emphasis on understanding the visual, aural and contextual aspects of a variety of communications media such as: film, video, print media, outdoor advertising and web pages. Elements of control in message design, as well as conceptual frameworks in popular culture, will he addressed from still and moving images, to sound, color, texture and text. Message Design will prepare students entering fields of media production to under-stand the inherent meaning of every element of mass media construction.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING

    ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to stimulate writing in prose and poetry, with emphasis on readings and exercises in craft.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM1020
    FILM PRODUCTION I

    FILM1020
    FILM PRODUCTION I

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This introductory production class gives students the foundation for creating films. We will cover the basic use of a digital camera (Sony a6000), camera exposure for filmmaking along with the basics of camera shots, angles, and movement. Additionally, the course covers introductory levels of filmmaking for lights (3-point lighting set-ups, C-stands, clamps, flags, cutters, color temperature/gels),sound (portable recording; single & double system recording), and editing (Adobe Premiere Pro, including titles and basic effects and color tools). Students will learn chroma keying/green screen production and lighting for green screen. In the class, we create short films to demonstrate how these basic filmmaking tools are used to tell stories, influence emotions and connect to people through sound and images. Students will draw upon their experiences in Intro to Film & Visual Storytelling to craft a short individual film project (2-3 minutes). They will also work in small groups to produce a short film of any type (3-5 minutes).|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM1025
    FILM AND VISUAL STORYTELLING

    FILM1025
    FILM AND VISUAL STORYTELLING

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course provides a basic introduction to the world of film, including a brief history and the technology and tools that have made film possible. The course though is focused primarily on film as the arrangement of images into something we call a story. Together we examine the process of telling stories with moving images - that is how to craft a story in relation to composition, color, sound, and editing. We explore two main film genres, narrative and documentary, and discuss how storytelling is fundamental to them. For narrative film we examine dramatic storytelling aspects such as mise-en-scène, concept, character, theme, plot, and dialog. In documentary film we explore how filmmakers can incorporate strong, often character-driven stories that also have a beginning, middle and end. We look at how they can raise issues with much at stake, offer rising tensions, and still utilize a narrative arc that keeps viewers actively engaged. We look also at experimental/avant-garde films, that is non-narrative forms of filmmaking, which focus on movement, rhythm, and composition, because ideas and techniques from this genre have and continue to influence story-based filmmaking.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2010
    INTERNATIONAL FILM HISTORY

    FILM2010
    INTERNATIONAL FILM HISTORY

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we analyze film style across a selection of international films from diverse regional, national and local contexts. We connect the threads of world cinema, asking students to compare and contrast a work from one time and place to any number of its geographically distant offspring. Major international films encourage us to reconsider what cinema is and how new ideas, feelings, and worlds come into being. As such, we study and analyze films from India, Canada, Sweden, Nigeria, South Korea, Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, China and more. We compare and contrast styles along the way. We also explore broader questions about the usefulness of working in a globally-identifiable film style.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2015
    FILM THEORY AND ANALYSIS

    FILM2015
    FILM THEORY AND ANALYSIS

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides an introductory overview to film theory and methods of film analysis. We explore the interaction between a film’s subject and style to reach an informed analysis of cinematic aesthetics. We explore how cinema functions as a medium, art form and practice, institution, and how cinema signifies (e.g. communicates, produces meanings, and constructs itself as a language). There are a range of critical methods for the study of media texts: realism, formalism, auteur theory, theories of spectatorship and reception, feminism, queer theory, Marxist film theory, cultural studies, postcolonialism, among many others. Through analysis and examination of major areas of film theory and criticism, this course helps students become informed, critically engaged readers/viewers of global media texts and practices. Preg: FILM1025|

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1025

  • FILM2020
    FILMMAKING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

    FILM2020
    FILMMAKING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, we will explore how filmmakers across time and place have chosen to create films for social change. We will link to this and discuss as part of the Mission of La Roche University. Documentary films, immersive virtual and augmented reality, participatory filmmaking, installation films, and other creative media experiences will be explored and analyzed in this context - with special consideration of their strategic communication campaigns and in recent eras an online presence. The class will also explore important concepts relative to these products such as advocacy, bias and manipulation. Students will work in teams to create a film proposal for a documentary that advocates for positive social change, and identify relevant film festivals for submission.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM2030
    FILM PRODUCTION II

    FILM2030
    FILM PRODUCTION II

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course students learn more in-depth aspects of digital camera operations, including using an advanced digital camera (Sony a7iii) and learning how to produce specialty camera movements with training on a DJI-Ronin S. Students are also introduced to more advanced levels of lighting (light meters, Flex-Fill, Bounce Boards, high-key and low-key lighting), sync sound (with lavalier, camera mounted, and shotgun microphones), basics of sound design and audio mixing (in Adobe Audition), and more advanced digital editing (e.g., special effects, color correcting). Students will work in groups to create a short documentary (5-8 minutes) focused on an issue related to positive social change (applying what they learned in the previous semester in Filmmaking for Social Change). Students will also draw upon all technical skills from Film Production I for films produced this semester. Some hours will be required of students to join productions in the Film Production IV course (offered same semester). Prereq: FILM1020|

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1020

  • FILM3015
    FILM PRODUCTION III

    FILM3015
    FILM PRODUCTION III

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this class students will increase the production value of their filmmaking skills. Students will work more in-depth with advanced lighting (such as light a moving subject, utilize negative fill, color) and sound (including how to design atmospheric sound to enhance their storytelling). The class will also advance student editing skills with training in Adobe After Effects and include a focus on color grading. The class emphasizes the role of a Director and students will begin working with actors and produce a short narrative film (8-12 minutes) by further developing and applying skills they have learned from Film Production I & II. We will apply what they learned about film aesthetics in Film Theory & Analysis and incorporate Creative Writing both taken in the previous semester. Basics in screenwriting will be covered so we can produce a short narrative screenplay early in the semester.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM2030

  • FILM4010
    FILM PRODUCTION IV

    FILM4010
    FILM PRODUCTION IV

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this class students will learn production skills at an advanced level. Students will work in groups to produce short films of any type with an emphasis on developing their roles as producers. Students will rotate role as producer for each film, while other students will direct, film, and edit. Additionally, we will examine fundraising options (traditional and social media platforms), budgeting, dealing with stock footage and music rights, legal and ethical considerations, and distribution options. In the course students will also incorporate new technologies such as virtual/augmented reality and 360 video into their film projects. Students should draw upon all technical skills from Film Production I-III for films produced this semester.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM3015

  • FILM4051
    INTERNSHIP I - FILM

    FILM4051
    INTERNSHIP I - FILM

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    PREREQUISITES:

  • FILM4055
    FILM CAPSTONE PROJECT

    FILM4055
    FILM CAPSTONE PROJECT

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course allows students to design and complete a film project in an area of their choice. The film project should bring multiple elements into a substantial film and draw upon all of their courses and experiences to date at La Roche University. Film requires faculty approval and regular meetings with the film capstone committee (made up of 2 La Roche University faculty/staff and a local film professional/scholar). All graduating film major seniors will take this course together. This will allow for a workshop and critique environment, helping students further move their filmmaking forward.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    GCDN2016
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will explore digital capture and handling of photographs enabling the student to master the technical aspects of digital image capture. Students will learn techniques for editing and enhancing photographs, become familiar with photography’s various roles: art form, journalism, advertising and will produce a portfolio of quality color and black and white prints from digital files. This course is for design majors only.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SASUxxxx

    SASUxxxx

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL2070
    CULTURE AND HUMAN SOCIETIES

    SOCL2070
    CULTURE AND HUMAN SOCIETIES

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Sociological study of what we mean by culture is taken and critically applied to the discussion of global-historical transformations in human social development, from the period of simple societies to the present age of complex, industrial, and globalized societies.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Courses Required: 15 Credits

  • GCDN4028
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IV

    GCDN4028
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IV

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to self-author a large body of photographic work building upon one or more of the concepts previously studied in the minor. In addition students will also learn about important professional practice skills such as publishing work both on personal and professional stock sites,continued self-evaluation skills, and how to earn freelance opportunities. This class will culminate in the students producing and presenting a collective body of work for showcase. Prereq: GCDN3012|

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN3012

Major Electives: 15 credits

  • CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION

    CMET1002
    MASS MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The subject matter of this course is the history and development of mass communication. The course will include examining the origin, economics, technology, mode of communication, communication effectiveness, social role and future of a variety of communication media including: newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film and computer-mediated-communication.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET1001 or SLSO1008

  • CMET3007
    INTRODUCTION TO GAMES STUDIES

    CMET3007
    INTRODUCTION TO GAMES STUDIES

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course is an introduction to the significance of games through human history and their evolving role in the digital age. The course will include examining how games are made, logical progressions of play, how games can teach as well as create narrative structures similar to film, television and literature.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

    CMET4005
    GAMES, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will provide the student with a deep understanding of how a wide variety of games are produced by collaborative teams for purposes as varied as entertainment, training, marketing, sales, business and education. Students will be exposed to game logic, games for learning and training, and gamification concepts for a range of activities. Individual and group projects, research, surveys and simulations will all be major parts of the class learning activities. The social, cultural and economic implications and roles of games today and in the future will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CMET3007

  • ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING

    ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to teach students how to write advertising copy that targets various audiences and employs multiple venues: print, radio, TV, and the internet. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012(H)

  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST AND SOCIALMEDIA

    ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST AND SOCIALMEDIA

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012

  • FILM2035
    DRONES FOR PHOTO AND FILM

    FILM2035
    DRONES FOR PHOTO AND FILM

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    PREREQUISITES:

    JR/SR only

  • FILM2040
    FILMMAKING FOR THE WEB

    FILM2040
    FILMMAKING FOR THE WEB

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Video and time based media, in a variety of contexts, from short form narrative for mobile audiences, to virtual reality, augmented reality and game contexts is growing as a business on par with Hollywood Studio filmmaking and distribution. This course exposes students to the myriad ways that video storytelling, narrative, fiction, non-fiction and games can be crafted and then turned into a business opportunity on the web. Looking for and creating an audience, using creative and quality means of expression, using social media for promotion, monetizing content, reading analytics, evaluating products and collaborating in teams will all be covered as part of the class. Students will explore different social media platforms, and analyze how to produce content for them, and pivot to new emerging mediums. The students will create and promote a YouTube Channel as a part of the class experience.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    FILM1020

  • GCDN2042
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY II

    GCDN2042
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY II

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Effective execution of exterior photography work. Through exploring a variety of exterior shooting conditions such as lighting, concept, compositional strategy, technical requirements, and advanced editing technique, students will learn to integrate core photography concepts into successful and effective skillset specializing in exterior photography. This course will require off campus travel. Prereq: GCDN2016|

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2016

  • GCDN3012
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY III

    GCDN3012
    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY III

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will study concepts, processes, and techniques related to the effective execution of interior photography work. Through exploring a variety of interior shooting conditions such as types of lighting, concept, compositional strategy, technical requirements, and advanced editing technique, students will learn to integrate core photography concepts into successful and effective skillset specializing in interior related photography. This course will require off campus travel. Prereq: GCDN2042|

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2042

  • GCDN3040
    PHOTOGRAPHY - SPECIAL TOPICS:

    GCDN3040
    PHOTOGRAPHY - SPECIAL TOPICS:

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The goal of this course is to offer an ever-changing topic of for specialized study in photography. Each time it runs it will feature a special topics class that will have its own course description and objectives based upon the topic(s) being covered. This elective will continue to rotate special topics classes for the first few years of its sequence upon which time the department may consider a permanent series of electives that can compliment the minor. Prereq: GCDN2016|

    PREREQUISITES:

    GCDN2016

  • MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS(ADMG2007)

    MRKT2007
    ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS(ADMG2007)

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A comprehensive study of advertising, detailing its relationship to marketing practice. Topics such as advertising preparation, media evaluation, market research, pricing and retailing problems are included. The role of public relations in an organizational communication program is also explained.Cross-listed with ADMG2007|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT3012
    BUYER BEHAVIOR

    MRKT3012
    BUYER BEHAVIOR

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on the role of buyers in the marketing process. Buyer behavior in the consumer marketplace as well as the organizational buying process is examined. The study of buying behaviors enhances understanding of what marketing strategies are likely to be effective, how humans operate in the marketplace, and what kind of affective, cognitive, and social mechanisms enter into the purchasing decision. A sampling of specific topics addressed includes the role of attitudes, learning and memory, and lifestyles and culture in the buying decision.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT3033
    MARKETING RESEARCH

    MRKT3033
    MARKETING RESEARCH

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Explores the function which links the consumer, customer, and public to the marketer through information -- information used to identify and define marketing opportunities and problems; generate, refine, and evaluate marketing actions; and, monitor marketing performance. This course deals with the planning for, collection, and analysis of data relevant to marketing decision-making and the communication of the results of this analysis to management.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MRKT3012

  • MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING

    MRKT3050
    INTERNET MARKETING

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Marketers have been using electronic tools for many years, but the Internet and other new electronic technologies have created a flood of interesting and innovative ways to provide customer value. Internet Marketing is traditional marketing using electronic methods. It affects traditional marketing in two ways. First, it increases efficiency in established marketing functions. Secondly, the technology of E-marketing transforms many marketing strategies. The transformation results in new business models that add customer value and may increase company profitability. These new opportunities create many questions that are addressed in this course. How can firms leverage new technologies to maximum benefit? How much commitment should marketers make to Internet marketing programs?|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2021 or MRKT2021

  • MRKT4014
    MARKETING STRATEGY

    MRKT4014
    MARKETING STRATEGY

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A capstone course in marketing that emphasizes planning at the management level. Examines key concepts and issues that impact planning decisions, such as analysis of the marketing environment; formulation of marketing strategies; and development, implementation, and control of the marketing program. Using case studies, students are expected to develop comprehensive marketing plans and recommended solutions to specific situations encountered by marketing professionals operating in a wide variety of organizations.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MRKT3012

  • SLDD1001
    COMING OF AGE: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    SLDD1001
    COMING OF AGE: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Coming of Age, we do not mean all stories with children and adolescents in them. In fact, for any film or piece of literature to fit our course, it must show a change, sometimes call a Rite of Passage, by at least one main youthful character into a new adult/mature role and/or identity. This can be either fiction or non-fiction. The character(s) may face challenges, for example, of responsibility, danger, and/or romance. The age of the character may be from childhood into early adulthood. So it's yes to Peter Pan and Holes but no to Cocoon.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1002
    FANTASY: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    SLDD1002
    FANTASY: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Fantasy, we do not mean all things that are Fictional or Adventurous. Most Fiction is actually very realistic, and so is not Fantasy.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1003
    MYSTERY: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    SLDD1003
    MYSTERY: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTHETICS

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By Mystery, we do not mean any fiction about a crime and/or has some unresolved element(s) to it but those Mysteries that involve fictional detectives, criminals, and the investigative methods.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTETHICS

    SLDD1007
    WAR: FILM AND LITERATURE (DD) LIT AND AESTETHICS

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce students, particularly non-English majors, to literary and cinematic criticism through the study of diverse works of literature and film. The focus of the course is twofold. First, we will consider works thematically - exploring a central issue in each term/section, such as Fantasy, Detective/Mystery, War, or Coming of Age through works that may come from various times and cultures. Second, we will investigate the works aesthetically by developing vocabularies and techniques for understanding our two major media (texts and cinema). In examining, discussing, presenting, and writing about these works, students will gain insight into the development, concerns, and significance of the genres, and more general knowledge of the theories and practices of textual and cinematic analysis. By ”War”, we do not mean any tale that has some conflict, fighting, or battle in it. These stories must be fictional or creative non-fiction (not a history textbook, for example) |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM

    SLLT1003
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to introduce non-majors to literary study through viewing film adaptations of Shakespeare in conjunction with reading the printed texts. By examining the relationship between the texts of the plays and their film interpretations, students will also be able to examine and analyze dramatic genres central to literary study and the study of Shakespeare: tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances.|

    PREREQUISITES: