Degrees and Requirements

National Security Studies

The "National Security Studies" major is, of necessity, interdisciplinary in nature. It also requires a strong internship or co-op program to enhance the student's employment opportunities. The major has rigorous requirements and students are advised that their future employment will normally require the successful completion of a comprehensive background investigation.

A major in National Security Studies is meant to prepare students for career opportunities with federal and state agencies, that have as part of their mission the defense of the homeland or the implementation of U.S. Foreign Policy and strategic objectives; multinational corporations that require personnel with research, analytical and communication skills; and for further study at the graduate level

Students must maintain a minimum QPA of 3.2 and need to earn a minimum of a "C" in all courses taken. The program requires that the graduate possess the following skills:

  • A reading competency in one of the required foreign languages
  • The ability to produce written reports based on research, correlation, and analysis
  • Oral presentation skills, to include computer facilitated presentations
  • Knowledge of statistical techniques
  • Knowledge of computer applications and data management systems.

At the beginning of a student's junior and senior year, a committee composed of the department chairs, or their representative, of the Justice, Law, and Security, International Studies, History and Modern Language Departments will review the progress of all students enrolled in the program. Students whose QPA falls below 3.2, whose foreign language reading ability is inadequate, or who exhibit behavioral or academic deficiencies that would, in the judgment of the reviewers, make future employment in the national security field unlikely, will be placed on probation or disenrolled from the major.

A minimum of 120 credits is required for degree, the last 30 of which must be earned at La Roche College.

To complete the "National Security Studies" major, the following course work is required:

  • 18 Arabic or 20 Spanish language credits
  • 27 National Security Studies" major required credits
  • 12 "National Security Studies" major elective credits
  • 6 Foreign Area Studies credits
  • 9 Skills Component credits
  • 34 Core Curriculum credits
  • 12-14 General Elective credits

Summary of Requirements

Foreign Area Studies: choose 6 credits

  • HIST2035
    HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA |

    HIST2035
    HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the growth and development of Hispano- and Luso-America from the European Conquest to the present. Emphasis is given to the interrelationships between the Church, the Military and the State, political and economic development, and social changes throughout Latin America.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3005
    CONTEMPORARY CENTRAL AMERICA |

    HIST3005
    CONTEMPORARY CENTRAL AMERICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Through class lectures, discussions, essay tests, a term paper, assigned readings, and slide and video presentations, this class shall review the history of the five Central American nations and their relationships, political, economic, and social, with the United States. Such concepts as economic dependency, neocolonialism, developmentalism, free market economic theory, grassroots democracy, militarism, liberation theology, and socialism will be discussed in depth, along with the general history of the five countries. The problems of indigenous peoples, human rights abuses, class stratification, and recent changes in religion, including phenomenal growth of Pentecostalism, shall be emphasized. By so doing, it is hoped that the student will come to a sophisticated understanding of the contemporary crises in Central America.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY (HIST3028) |

    INST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY (HIST3028) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of the history of Korea, Japan, China, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Malaysia. The domestic, political, social, and economic bases of the historical development of these nations will be considered. Political influences of other world powers will be considered. Cross-listed with HIST3028 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers the key episodes in the history of Africa from pre-colonial times, through the colonial and post-colonial periods. We examine ancient kingdoms, stateless societies, inter-cultural exchanges, ethnicity, empire-creation and state-building. British, French, Belgian, Dutch and Portuguese colonial systems in Africa are then analyzed. We proceed to look at the anti-colonial independence movements, economic development in post-colonial Africa, post-colonial state-building and political changes in present-day Africa.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (HIST3045) |

    POLI3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (HIST3045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course explores the peoples and history of the Middle East, from ancient times, including a procession of impressive empires, until their eventual domination by the Ottomans and finally, by British Empire. We investigate the accommodation of the British to Middle Eastern kingships and the impact of colonial state-building. We proceed to examine the establishment of the state of Israel and the evolution of Palestinian-Israeli relations over past half a century. Cross-listed with HIST3045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Requirements: 27 credits

  • ADMG1005
    MACROECONOMICS |

    ADMG1005
    MACROECONOMICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introductory economics course focusing on the field of macroeconomics, including government spending, money, inflation, unemployment and taxes. Also included are brief sections on microeconomic and economic systems.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CRIM1001
    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE |

    CRIM1001
    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This introductory course will introduce criminal justice as a system that is an institutional agent of American society. The components of police, courts, and corrections are discussed with the goal of defining their function and purpose and interdependence on one another. The patterns of crime and the processes of the American Criminal Justice System, law enforcement, judicial process, and corrections will be examined. Students will learn the terminology of the field, examine the methods of inquiry used in the field, and learn the objectives, policies and procedures of probation, parole, and prisons as well as some of the issues and problems.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CRIM3036
    TERRORISM |

    CRIM3036
    TERRORISM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course addresses the historical and current-day development and spread of terrorism. The class investigates the goals of terrorism and the social, political and ideological reasons for the use of terrorism. Counter-terrorist activities and preventive measures are explored. The course will address law enforcement responses to incidents of terrorism.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012 or ENGL1012H

  • INST2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(POLI2001) |

    INST2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(POLI2001) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is an introductory course in the field of international relations, providing an overview of major theories and concepts of international relations and an historical background for contemporary world politics. Major topics include the contemporary international system, economic development, foreign policy behavior, international conflicts and international institutions. Cross-listed with POLI2001|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MATH1040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS |

    MATH1040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The study of the fundamentals of probability theory with applications to natural and social sciences as well as to mathematics. Discrete and continuous distributions, sampling theory, linear correlation, regression, statistical inference, estimation and analysis of variance are included.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1010

  • NSCS2011
    INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS & PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES (CRIM2011)|

    NSCS2011
    INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS & PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES (CRIM2011)|

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the process used by analysts to develop strategic intelligence. Students will participate throughout the course as a member of a group tasked to complete an estimative project. Students will learn to apply strategic theory to critical national security problems. Cross-listed with CRIM2011 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012 or ENGL1012H & CRIM1001

  • NSCS3011
    RESEARCH METHODS FOR ANALYSTS |

    NSCS3011
    RESEARCH METHODS FOR ANALYSTS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the research methods and presentation techniques utilized by intelligence analysts. The student will be immersed in the world of Open Source Intelligence and will be taught to use relevant analytical tools in the form of open source search techniques and Intellipedia software. Students will function as members of an intelligence cell where they will use analytical tools to create both team and individual intelligence reports focused on selected criminal and terrorist organizations. Each student in this course will, as a final exercise, be responsible for producing an intelligence product and presenting a PowerPoint-based briefing to a panel of experts drawn from the Intelligence Community.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    NSCS3010

  • NSCS4005
    NATIONAL SECURITY & INTELLIGENCE-SENIOR SEMINAR |

    NSCS4005
    NATIONAL SECURITY & INTELLIGENCE-SENIOR SEMINAR |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is the capstone course required of all national security studies majors. Senior students will engage in an in-depth study of both the historical and current national security policies of the United States and selected foreign countries. Students are expected to possess excellent research and writing skills to be successful in this course. They are required to write and orally present several short white papers dealing with critical issues in the areas of national security and intelligence. The students’ knowledge base is evaluated during this course through the use of a comprehensive examination that encompasses the six national security major required courses. The course culminates with an extensive white paper and oral presentation concerning a current national security policy of the United States or a foreign country if the policy impacts the security posture of the United States.toms.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    NSCS2011 & NSCS3011

  • POLI3015
    HISTORY/POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3015) |

    POLI3015
    HISTORY/POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3015) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we inquire into the origins, evolution and development of political philosophies, focusing on the theories that have shaped Western political thought from ancient times to the present day. Key concepts in Western political thought such as liberty, justice, morality, political rights, and democracy are examined. Students will also be asked to create their own political theories. Students will learn the genesis of political thought over the past 2,000 years, how to critically assess these theories, and how to create their own theories. Cross-listed with HIST3015.|

    PREREQUISITES:

National Security Studies Electives: 12 credits

  • CRIM3034
    ENTERPRISE & TRANSNATIONAL CRIME |

    CRIM3034
    ENTERPRISE & TRANSNATIONAL CRIME |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course addresses organized crime in the United States and internationally. It presents organized crime as criminal business ventures that meet the demand of its consumer base and/or engages in activities that provide profits both legal and illicit into the organization. International crime is introduced, demonstrating how organized crime networks transcend national borders, and how individual criminals have learned to use the ease of travel and identity falsification to operate in or conceal themselves from national law enforcement. Law enforcement strategies and their effectiveness are covered.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CRIM1001 & ENGL1012 or ENGL1012H

  • CRIM3043
    COMPUTER CRIME |

    CRIM3043
    COMPUTER CRIME |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A comprehensive examination of computer crime, information systems security and cyber law. The investigative process as applied to the cyber criminal will be emphasized. Statutes specific to cyber crime will be studied. Crime prevention strategies and techniques will be presented and applied using the case study method.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of major theories of international political economy including a more detailed understanding of the fast growing economic and institutional infrastructure of the international system. Topics include the development of intergovernmental and non-governmental international organizations (IGOs and NGOs), international treaties and laws governing trade and business practices, and mechanisms for the resolutions of international disputes. Cross-listed with ADMG3003 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG1005

  • MATH1070
    FINITE MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS |

    MATH1070
    FINITE MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces MIST students to the non-statistical and non-calculus topics in mathematics that are most relevant to their majors. The major topics to be studied include some or all of the following: logic; set theory; relations, with applications to relational algebra and relational calculus; sequences, geometric series, and mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations and matrices; linear programming; probability; and game theory. Excel enhanced by Visual Basic for Applications is used throughout the course.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1010

  • NSCS3010
    BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE |

    NSCS3010
    BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course explores the methods used to obtain and analyze data to create information that businesses can utilize in making decisions. An emphasis is placed on using public source information to meet the objectives of practical exercise scenarios.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012 or ENGL1012H

  • NSCS3015
    FINANCIAL INVESTIGATION & ANALYSIS |

    NSCS3015
    FINANCIAL INVESTIGATION & ANALYSIS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    PREREQUISITES:

  • NSCS4012
    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & CRISIS MANAGEMENT(CRIM4012) |

    NSCS4012
    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & CRISIS MANAGEMENT(CRIM4012) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the issues and processes associated with the most critical domains of security management. In particular, the course will focus on risk analysis, security surveys, response planning, and the principles of the all-hazards approach to risk management. Cross-listed with CRIM4012|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • NSCS4057

    NSCS4057

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, the basic beliefs of Islam are reviewed, along with a brief history of Islam's overall development and its impact on the world and on various civilizations in different global regions. Islam's internal sects are analyzed, and its political impact on current politics in the world is explored. The role of U.S. foreign policy in dealing with the recent rise of Islam is also analyzed. Cross-listed with HIST/SOCL2045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PSYC1021
    INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY |

    PSYC1021
    INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This survey course introduces students to several critical areas of psychology. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on the scientific method, its application to psychology, and the insights gained from scientific research. The interactions among biological processes, cognitive and emotional responses, sociocultural forces, and behavior are examined. Included are such diverse topics as: health, stress, and coping; consciousness, sleep and dreams; effects of psychoactive drugs on behavior and health; psychological disorders; social psychology; types of learning and behavior management, information processing approaches including memory, encoding and retrieval; and the relationship of the nervous system to thought, feelings, and behaviors.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • PSYC3030
    INTERPERSONAL & GROUP DYNAMICS |

    PSYC3030
    INTERPERSONAL & GROUP DYNAMICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course reviews current psychological theory and research on small groups and interpersonal relations with an examination of interaction between individual behavior and group phenomena. The course provides a significant experience in the dynamics of a small group.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    PSYC1021 or PSYC1021H

Skills Component: choose 9 credits

  • CRIM4030
    COMPUTER FORENSICS INVESTIGATIONS |

    CRIM4030
    COMPUTER FORENSICS INVESTIGATIONS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides a comprehensive examination of the application of computer security techniques to the physical evidence of a crime. Crime scene processing procedures will be utilized in the analysis of physical digital evidence. The course will also include training in report writing and courtroom testimony, to include a moot court exercise.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CRIM3043 & CSCI3042

  • CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    CSCI1010
    PROGRAMMING I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the art of algorithm design and problem solving in the context of computer programming. The basic structure and logic of the Java language is presented. Topics covered include data types and operators, control flow, repetition and loop statements, arrays and pointers. Good programming practices will be taught and encouraged.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI1002 or SLSC1005 or SLSC1012 & Concur: CSCI1010L

  • CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    CSCI1010L
    PROGRAMMING I-LAB |

    Credits (Min/Max): 1/1

    Lab work for CSCI1010 Programming I.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • CSCI3042
    COMPUTER SECURITY |

    CSCI3042
    COMPUTER SECURITY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers fundamental issues and first principles of security and information assurance. The course will look at the security policies, models and mechanisms related to confidentiality, integrity, authentication, identification, and availability issues related to information and information systems. Other topics covered include basics of cryptography (e.g., digital signatures) and network security (e.g., intrusion detection and prevention), risk management, security assurance and secure design principles, as well as e-commerce security. Issues such as organizational security policy, legal and ethical issues in security, standards and methodologies for security evaluation and certification will also be covered.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    CSCI4045 & CSCI1010 or CSCI1010 & ISTC2030

  • ISTC1025
    COMPUTER HARDWARE |

    ISTC1025
    COMPUTER HARDWARE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides both a theoretical and a hands-on, detailed, progressive examination of personal (PC) computer system hardware, both stand alone personal computers and distributed-data/networking hardware. Throughout the course, the concepts discussed, and the hardware-related problems presented for discussion and solution, are typical of the knowledge required to work with personal and business-world computer hardware applications, providing excellent experience for the students.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ISTC2021
    MGMT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS |

    ISTC2021
    MGMT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides discussion and analysis of current issues related to the management of information systems. The components of an information system; hardware, software, data, connectivity, procedures and people are discussed in relationship to a variety of information systems including collaboration information systems, social media information systems, and enterprise wide systems such as Enterprise Resource Planning, Customer Relationship Management and Supply Chain Management. Other major areas of analysis include cloud computing, business intelligence, and the Systems Development Life Cycle. The focus of the analysis is using Information Systems to gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ISTC2030
    NETWORKING |

    ISTC2030
    NETWORKING |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides students with an introductory examination of computer-based networked environments. Of particular interest in this course is providing students with both a conceptual as well as an applied understanding of networks and networking. Students will be introduced to the organizational framework in which networking exists. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to explore networking on practical and applied levels so that issues such as hardware and software solutions and applications, as they relate to networked environments, will be examined.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ISTC1005

  • ISTC2045
    DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS |

    ISTC2045
    DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides the basic knowledge required to operate and use a computer to perform the practical tasks of data file creation, retrieval of data and maintenance of data files. DBMS's are used for all types of applications involving medium-to-large scale data files. Major focus is on the acquisition of a working knowledge of the theories, principles and operating procedures of data base management systems using a representative DBMS. This course is appropriate for all potential users of computers in all fields of study.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ISTC1005