Degrees and Requirements

Political Science

A major in Political Science helps to prepare students for careers in politics, government, global service, legal studies, graduate studies, journalism, and diplomacy. To successfully complete the Political Science major, the following coursework is required:

  • 9 credits of Political Science Requirements
  • 30 credits of Political Science Major Electives
  • 34 credits of CORE Curriculum courses
  • 47 credits of General Electives
  • A minimum of 120 credits is required for degree, the last 30 of which must be taken at La Roche College

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Summary of Requirements

Major Component: 9 Credits

  • POLI1022
    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT |

    POLI1022
    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces students to the major American political institutions, the way in which the houses of Congress function, and the Presidency while also analyzing civil liberties, constitutional rights, policy-making, social policy issues, the role of political parties, the electoral process, the political role of the media, and foreign policy debates.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3015
    HISTORY/POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3015) |

    POLI3015
    HISTORY/POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3015) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we inquire into the origins, evolution and development of political philosophies, focusing on the theories that have shaped Western political thought from ancient times to the present day. Key concepts in Western political thought such as liberty, justice, morality, political rights, and democracy are examined. Students will also be asked to create their own political theories. Students will learn the genesis of political thought over the past 2,000 years, how to critically assess these theories, and how to create their own theories. Cross-listed with HIST3015.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3021
    COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT(INST3021) |

    POLI3021
    COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT(INST3021) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on the government, policies and politics of different nation-states around the world, and investigates the political science approaches to studying government and politics in various areas of the world. The focus in not only on forms of governments, but also the major political and social factors that affect political change in different world areas, the relationship between states and societies, and the comparative study of democratic and non-democratic nations. Cross-listed with INST3021 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3050
    POLITICS OF WEAK STATES |

    POLI3050
    POLITICS OF WEAK STATES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The number of weak states continues to increase throughout the world; we intend to explore the various reasons explaining why this is the case. Weak states are characterized by national governments with a declining ability to make policies or to carry them out – even the most basic policies such as law enforcement, tax collection, sanitation systems, or road-building. More and more countries in the Middle East, Africa, parts of Asia, Eastern Europe and Central America reflect weak state characteristics, and we will analyze various countries in these regions to better appreciate the dynamics of this process. The social effects of state weakness include a deepening of poverty, civil war, the spread of communicable diseases, and major increases in emigration. In some cases, local societies are turning towards citizen mobilization, self-help groups, informal street markets, and locally organized peaceful political movements to return to a sense of civility and normalcy. What constructive role can ‘civil society’ play in weak states? What opportunities for ‘non-state politics’ and society-based political institutions arise out of the lacunae created by weak states? Learning about these processes will enrich and broaden students’ understanding of comparative politics as a sub-field within Political Science. Student assignments include required readings; tests and exams; in-class participation; a research paper; and short written assignments. Students will be expected to ‘adopt’ a weak state and develop expertise about that state as the course progresses. |

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- American Politics: 12 credits

  • COMM4009
    MEDIA & DEMOCRACY |

    COMM4009
    MEDIA & DEMOCRACY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The concept of community, including individual responsibilities, will be the centerpiece of this course as democracy is ultimately the recognition of individual rights as well as commitment to the intrinsic equality of everyone in a community. Understanding current events, the evolving news process, and critical media concepts such as agenda setting and institutional bias will be an important part of the class. In learning the history and development of both democracy and media, we will examine and debate significant issues and their impact through primary documents such as Supreme Court decisions, the Constitution, FCC orders and regulations, and the commentary and analysis on each.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Reserved for JR/SR Only

  • COMM4013
    RULE OF LAW |

    COMM4013
    RULE OF LAW |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course, through the integration of legal, historical and political concepts, introduces students to the rule of law one of the current governing principles of Western civilization and the historical foundation of that civilizations rights and liberties and its role in the American community. By using the rule of law as a guiding principle, this course insures that students develop a perspective on the community and its relationship to the individual that includes an historical knowledge of both the American and international legal systems, the political and social reasons for making a commitment to be governed by the rule of law, and an understanding of law as an essential pillar of American and Global Communities. Students will be introduced to the sometimes conflicting rights and duties of individuals and communities through an examination of selected appellate court cases, which will demonstrate the difficulty in resolving societal issues involving conflict between individuals and communities.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Reserved for JR/SR Only

  • HIST1011
    US HIST:EMERG OF MASS DEMOCRACY (1865-1945) |

    HIST1011
    US HIST:EMERG OF MASS DEMOCRACY (1865-1945) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the history of the United States from 1865 to 1945. This course traces the development of the United States from the aftermath of the Civil War to its emergence as a world superpower, noting the events, people and ideas involved in that development. Particular emphasis is given to Reconstruction, industrial development and World War II. Cross-listed with SLHS1006 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3000
    HISTORY & CULTURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS |

    HIST3000
    HISTORY & CULTURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the Native Americans from prehistoric time to the present with emphasis on the uniqueness of Native American culture, and the impact of Euro-American contact on native American societies.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3038
    HISTORY OF BLACK AMERICANS (POLI3038) |

    HIST3038
    HISTORY OF BLACK AMERICANS (POLI3038) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A history of the experience of Black Americans from their origins in West Africa to contemporary times. Emphasis is given to the various systems of slavery in America; the impact of slavery on American society; emancipation and reconstruction; contributions of Black Americans and self-help; Black Americans in war and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's and 1970's. Cross-listed with POLI3038|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI1003
    UNDERSTANDING THE U.S. CONSTITUTION (CRIM1003) |

    POLI1003
    UNDERSTANDING THE U.S. CONSTITUTION (CRIM1003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the U.S. Constitution's role in American society and the philosophical, historical, and political influences on its framers. The course focuses on the structure and content of the Constitution. The course also examines the landmark Supreme Court cases that have shaped American society from 1790 to the present time. Students, through a multimedia approach, will examine those cases and the historical, social, and political factors that were a backdrop to the rulings issued by the Court. Cross-listed with CRIM1003|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1011

  • POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, the basic beliefs of Islam are reviewed, along with a brief history of Islam's overall development and its impact on the world and on various civilizations in different global regions. Islam's internal sects are analyzed, and its political impact on current politics in the world is explored. The role of U.S. foreign policy in dealing with the recent rise of Islam is also analyzed. Cross-listed with HIST/SOCL2045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3002
    HISTORY OF EUROPEAN DIPLOMACY (HIST3002) |

    POLI3002
    HISTORY OF EUROPEAN DIPLOMACY (HIST3002) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The internationally accepted style of diplomacy had its origins in Italy in the late 1400's. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of diplomacy as well as its use by European powers: classical diplomacy in the 19th century and the impact of that system on other areas of the globe. The decline of European syle diplomacy in the World War/Cold War era is described. Cross-listed with HIST3002 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3005
    CONSTITUTIONAL LAW(CRIM3005) |

    POLI3005
    CONSTITUTIONAL LAW(CRIM3005) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will explore the difficulty in interpreting the meaning of constitutional language. The interpretive role of the U.S. Supreme Court will be studied through an examination of landmark constitutional decisions. The major schools of thought that guide interpretation will also be studied. Cross-listed with CRIM3005.(Previously POLI2005)|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3023
    MODERN U.S. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY (HIST/INST3023) |

    POLI3023
    MODERN U.S. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY (HIST/INST3023) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course presents a study of the major developments in American diplomatic history. Special emphasis is placed on the years from World War II until the present. Major international developments and their effects on American diplomacy are discussed along with the impact of various presidents and the influence of the United Nations. The interrelation between foreign policy and domestic opinion is also examined. Cross-listed with HIST/INST3023 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3033
    AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (INST3033) |

    POLI3033
    AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (INST3033) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The reasons behind the foreign policy decisions of the U.S. government in recent decades are examined; different theories are explored for explaining shifts and continuities in foreign policy decision-making. Contemporary challenges to American foreign policy, from Iraq and Iran to Afghanistan, Syria and the Middle East are analyzed. Cross-listed with INST3033 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3036
    HIST OF AMERICAN VALUES, BELIEFS(HIST3036) |

    POLI3036
    HIST OF AMERICAN VALUES, BELIEFS(HIST3036) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we explore the central values, beliefs and ideas that have helped to both shape and reflect the changing history of the United States. Special attention is paid to how particularly important values and ideas reflected certain time periods in American history, and helped to make this country unique. America's values and beliefs evolved both from social changes and grassroots political movements as well as from its leaders and influential thinkers. Contemporary ideas and values in America are provided considerable attention. Cross-listed with HIST3036 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3037
    THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY |

    POLI3037
    THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we compare and contrast different U.S. presidents though the history of the country, survey the strengths and weaknesses of different presidents, while analyzing the overall challenges to serving effectively as president. The role of the electoral college is examined with regard to the complexities of campaigning for and successfully competing in U.S. presidental elections, especially the upcoming election and the most recent election.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3039
    POLITICS & SOCIETY(SOCL3039) |

    POLI3039
    POLITICS & SOCIETY(SOCL3039) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course is designed to familiarize the student with the social bases of political power. Politics is viewed as a process in relation to the social and economic structures, which influence its direction. A consideration of the effects which politics has on these structures is also offered. A detailed analysis of the primacy of politics in the 20th century is included. Cross-listed with SOCL3039 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3042
    THE CIVIL WAR (HIST3042) |

    POLI3042
    THE CIVIL WAR (HIST3042) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course begins by addressing the social, economic, racial and political factors that lead up and result in the Civil War. The political and military leaderships and decision-making on both sides of the Civil War constitute a major portion of the course. In addition, students will how military strategies shifted continuously throughout the war, and crucial battles will be accorded substantial attention. Micro-level aspects of battlefield experiences – by the soldiers themselves, observers, the journals of military generals, health care in the field of battle – are discussed throughout the course. Race relations within the U.S. army and the role of African-Americans as soldiers will also be an important topic of analysis. The particular role of President Lincoln both as Commander in Chief and in his civilian role as the nation’s chief executive will be given a particular focus. The social and political importance of the Gettysburg Address and of the submission of the 13th Amendment to Congress both will receive extended analysis, along with attention to the broader social, political and economic implications of the war. Student requirements include assigned readings; journal entries; videos/film; class participation; discussion board participation; exams; research papers.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3060
    NATIVE AMERICAN POLITICS |

    POLI3060
    NATIVE AMERICAN POLITICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course enables students to engage with contemporary Native American political issues and controversies, including the Black Dakota oil pipeline and similar crises on other Native American reservations. The course addresses a broad range of current issues affecting Native American communities, including land control on reservations; interactions with neighboring communities; the role of the federal and state governments; the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its relations with tribal councils; and Native American identity issues. The course will in particular provide significant attention to environmental problems on Native American lands and how indigenous councils try to grapple with these, while taking into account a long history of interventions and/or regulations imposed by the federal and state governments.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI4051

    POLI4051

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLHS1002
    MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. |

    SLHS1002
    MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we examine the history of different ethnic and racial immigrants in the United States; the process of ethnic assimilation into mainstream American culture; and how different groups and races have been treated by the U.S. government. In addition, we examine the reasons that ethnic and racial groups departed their own countries to emigrate here, and recent immigration experiences and changes in U.S. immigration policy.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL1034
    RACE & ETHNICITY(SLSO1004) |

    SOCL1034
    RACE & ETHNICITY(SLSO1004) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the social relationships of racial, ethnic, religious and other minority groups with emphasis on personal, cultural and social development. Cross-listed with SLSO1004. Class start the week of 01/26/2015.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL2038
    WEALTH, POWER, & PRESTIGE |

    SOCL2038
    WEALTH, POWER, & PRESTIGE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The course presents a study of the causes and consequences of political, economic and social inequality. The systematic ranking of individuals and aggregates is analyzed. Institutional and non-institutional determinants of inequality are examined so as to understand the distribution of wealth, status and prestige in society.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Comparative Politics: Conceptual Analysis: 3 Credits

  • GEOG3013
    GEOGRAPHY & WORLD AFFAIRS (INST3013) |

    GEOG3013
    GEOGRAPHY & WORLD AFFAIRS (INST3013) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of various regions of the world and the environmental conditions to which people adapt. Racial, linguistic, religious and economic groupings of people will be stressed. Current world events are examined to develop knowledge about historical, geographic, climatic, political and religious environments which people inhabit. Cross-listed with INST3013 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(INST2001) |

    POLI2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(INST2001) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is an introductory course in the field of international relations, providing an overview of major theories and concepts of international relations and an historical background for contemporary world politics. Major topics include the contemporary international system, economic development, foreign policy behavior, international conflicts and international institutions. Cross-listed with INST2001 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3030
    COMPARATIVE DEMOCRACIES |

    POLI3030
    COMPARATIVE DEMOCRACIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course provides a deep examination of the workings of different democratic political systems in various parts of the world. Ranging from presidentially dominant to parliament-dominant, from low electoral turnout to mandatory universal voting, this course will reveal the impressive distinctions among the world’s democracies. This course will also make clear the crucial role of political culture of values in fortifying democracies. We also examine how to consolidate weak democracies, as well as studying the rise of ‘hybrid democracies’ and mixed democratic-autocratic systems of government. Requirements include class participation, exams, research papers, on-line discussion board participation, and library research.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3053
    PEASANT POLITICS (HIST3053) |

    POLI3053
    PEASANT POLITICS (HIST3053) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we focus our attention on the history and politics of farmers cultivating small land plots who struggle to hold onto their lands despite legal and illegal efforts by outsiders to take it from them. Peasant political movements and social actions are examined. We also analyze market-based efforts by farmers to increase their income; community efforts to enact new policies aimed at self-protection; food crop-growing, artisanry and other efforts at self-sufficiency; and inter-community 'sharing' economies. At the same time, we examine peasant social movements, local community activism, and recent efforts by peasant actors to link up with global and national non-profit agencies and global institutions. Cross-listed with HIST3053|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Comparative Politics: Conflicts and War: 3 Credits

  • CRIM3036
    TERRORISM |

    CRIM3036
    TERRORISM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course addresses the historical and current-day development and spread of terrorism. The class investigates the goals of terrorism and the social, political and ideological reasons for the use of terrorism. Counter-terrorist activities and preventive measures are explored. The course will address law enforcement responses to incidents of terrorism.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1012 or ENGL1012H

  • POLI3040
    ETHNIC CONFLICT(SOCL3040) |

    POLI3040
    ETHNIC CONFLICT(SOCL3040) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we examine why ethnic groups sometimes get along very well, but other times engage in conflict. We query: What are the political and social origins of ethnic conflicts in various parts of the world? Do ethnic conflicts differ in different world regions? What national and international policies encourage ethnic conflict? How can we encourage ethnic groups to pursue peaceful accommodations?Cross-listed with SOCL3040|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3055
    TODAY'S GLOBAL WARS |

    POLI3055
    TODAY'S GLOBAL WARS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    By ‘global wars’ we refer to wars being fought in various parts of the world that have multi-nation implications, and/or are likely to crucial impacts on various global alliances. They also have important impacts on the political systems within many different countries, including the U.S. The global ‘war against terror’ will be closely examined in this course. Global wars also include the current wars in Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Mali, and Ukraine-Russia as well as potential wars such as those involving North Korea, Turkey (vs. Kurdistan), Palestine-Israel – and others that have broad implications for multiple nations and world areas. Throughout the course, students will follow on-going relevant events in real time, and this will inform what takes place in class and in their assignments. Policy decision-making by the U.S. government and other world powers will occupy a major line of inquiry, as will our quest to understand why these wars emerge in the first place. Finally, we will examine how it might be possible to transform global wars into potential opportunities to achieve progress toward global peace. Student requirements include class participation; research assignments; real-time web-interactive assignments; written exams; in-class presentations; discussion board participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3065
    WORLD WAR II (HIST3065) |

    POLI3065
    WORLD WAR II (HIST3065) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, students will learn the political, social and economic factors which helped to lead to World War II, including the rise of Nazism, the impact of the Great Depression, the weaknesses of Weimar Germany, political problems in France and Poland, the rise of fascism in Italy. The course then focuses on Germany’s invasions of Austria, Poland, and then the rest of Europe, including Russia, and the military resistance to these invasions. In 1941, the U.S. enters the war, and Japan’s role expands, which alters the global geo-military strategic map in dramatic ways from that point until the war’s conclusion in 1945. Students will learn of political leadership controversies and army decision-making on both sides, and how that affected the outcome of some of the war’s most important battles (land, sea and air). Both the Pacific and Euro-Russian fronts will be covered in substantial depth in regard to military strategies, political concerns, and the leadership roles of Churchill, FDR and Stalin. The role of the SS in Germany and conquered European states will be analyzed, as will the rising importance of the concentration camps through the early 1940s and how that led to money and resources being channeled to the Jewish extermination effort instead of to the German army on the war fronts. The impact of the war on global politics will be underlined toward the conclusion of the course. Students will be expected to do extensive readings of scholarly books, articles and original, primary documents, such as letters from military generals and soldiers' letters. Evaluation will be based on quizzes, tests, research papers, as well on-line discussion forums, attendance and in-class participation. Cross-listed with HIST3065|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3082
    SOCIAL MOVEMENT & RESISTANCE (SOCL3082) |

    POLI3082
    SOCIAL MOVEMENT & RESISTANCE (SOCL3082) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the origin, growth, and dynamics of social movements as forms of social protest and resistance against state and global injustices. Discussions include case studies of various social and political groups, non-government organizations, and liberation and revolutionary movements in the U.S. and throughout the world. Cross-listed with SOCL3082 |

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Comparative Politics: Nations and People: 3 Credits

  • HIST3020
    RUSSIA & THE SOVIET WORLD |

    HIST3020
    RUSSIA & THE SOVIET WORLD |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the emergence of imperial Russia as a European power, its expansion and industrialization, the forces which blended to bring about the Revolution of 1917, the growth and development of the Soviet Union under Lenin and Stalin, and the fall of communism. Special emphasis is given to Marxism as it has been put into practice in the Soviet system.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3026
    HISTORY OF MODERN GERMANY |

    HIST3026
    HISTORY OF MODERN GERMANY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the impact of the French Revolution on German political and cultural life; of the growth of liberalism and nationalism; of the wars of unification, Bismarckian Germany and World War I; of the rise and fall of National Socialism and of the recovery and post-war problems.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    POLI2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST/SOCL2045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, the basic beliefs of Islam are reviewed, along with a brief history of Islam's overall development and its impact on the world and on various civilizations in different global regions. Islam's internal sects are analyzed, and its political impact on current politics in the world is explored. The role of U.S. foreign policy in dealing with the recent rise of Islam is also analyzed. Cross-listed with HIST/SOCL2045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3035
    FRENCH POLITICS & HISTORY (HIST3035) |

    POLI3035
    FRENCH POLITICS & HISTORY (HIST3035) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    We intend for students to obtain a significant deepening of their understanding of the chronological timeline of French history, and to advance their critical thinking skills regarding the analysis of key French historical events and social processes (History program Learning Objectives #1 Chronological Thinking and #6 Contextual Comprehension). At the same time, we intend for students to demonstrate an understanding of comparative political institutions (Political Science Learning Objective #10) with particular respect to the French executive and parliamentary branches; of political parties (Political Science Learning Objective #2) with particular respect to changes over the past half-century in the leading French political parties; as well as demonstrating a greater understanding of the role of elections in democracies (Political Science Learning Objective #11), here with respect to recent French electoral events such as the 2017 presidential election.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3047
    JEWISH HISTORY & POLITICS (HIST3047) |

    POLI3047
    JEWISH HISTORY & POLITICS (HIST3047) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course will begin with the Abrahamic and Moses legends, and proceed to analyze the territorial histories of the 12 tribes of Israel and Judea in ancient times; the creation of Reform-Orthodox divisions initiated by the Greek invasions of ancient Israel; the great migration waves to the north, east and west during the Syrian and Roman conquest periods and again during the Middle Ages; the Khazar kingdom; the emergence of Yiddish-speaking culture throughout eastern and western Europe; Jewish impacts on European labor movements; the rise of the modern Secular, Reform, Conservative and Ultra-Orthodox Jewish movements; Russian pogroms and Jewish emigration to the Americas; the Holocaust and a lost civilization; Zionism and the creation of the Israeli state; Jewish unionism in America: the ILGWU; Lox, Gefilte Fish, and Jewish cultural influences (music, musicals, Hollywood, comedy, such asYehudi Menuhin, Itzhak Perlman, Leonard Bernstein, and Ben Sidrin). The special contributions to science, business and politics by Albert Einstein, Henry Kissenger, and Michael Bloomberg. Current Israeli politics and Israel-related controversies. The return of Jewish life to Western Europe. Teaching tools will include textbooks, films/videos, debates, discussions, on-line readings. Student requirements include essays, exams, quizzes, discussion contributions, essays, and research projects. Cross-listed with HIST3047|

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Comparative Politics: World Regions: 3 Credits

  • HIST2000
    BRITAIN & ITS EMPIRE |

    HIST2000
    BRITAIN & ITS EMPIRE |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers the early history of Britain from pre-Roman times up through and beyond the Middle Ages and explores the political, social and economic origins of the British Empire. The empire is then examined in depth at its zenith in the 19th century as it became entrenched in different world areas; we explore the impact on local peoples and nations. The course concludes with attention to the decline of the British Empire.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3005
    CONTEMPORARY CENTRAL AMERICA |

    HIST3005
    CONTEMPORARY CENTRAL AMERICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Through class lectures, discussions, essay tests, a term paper, assigned readings, and slide and video presentations, this class shall review the history of the five Central American nations and their relationships, political, economic, and social, with the United States. Such concepts as economic dependency, neocolonialism, developmentalism, free market economic theory, grassroots democracy, militarism, liberation theology, and socialism will be discussed in depth, along with the general history of the five countries. The problems of indigenous peoples, human rights abuses, class stratification, and recent changes in religion, including phenomenal growth of Pentecostalism, shall be emphasized. By so doing, it is hoped that the student will come to a sophisticated understanding of the contemporary crises in Central America.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3027
    HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE (INST3027) |

    HIST3027
    HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE (INST3027) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey of the past two centuries of European history that is intended to provide global awareness and an appreciation of the accomplishments European civilization. Cross-listed with INST3027|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY(INST3028) |

    HIST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY(INST3028) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of the history of Korea, Japan, China, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Malaysia. The domestic, political, social, and economic bases of the historical development of these nations will be considered. Political influences of other world powers will be considered. Cross-listed with INST3028|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers the key episodes in the history of Africa from pre-colonial times, through the colonial and post-colonial periods. We examine ancient kingdoms, stateless societies, inter-cultural exchanges, ethnicity, empire-creation and state-building. British, French, Belgian, Dutch and Portuguese colonial systems in Africa are then analyzed. We proceed to look at the anti-colonial independence movements, economic development in post-colonial Africa, post-colonial state-building and political changes in present-day Africa.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (HIST3045) |

    POLI3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (HIST3045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course explores the peoples and history of the Middle East, from ancient times, including a procession of impressive empires, until their eventual domination by the Ottomans and finally, by British Empire. We investigate the accommodation of the British to Middle Eastern kingships and the impact of colonial state-building. We proceed to examine the establishment of the state of Israel and the evolution of Palestinian-Israeli relations over past half a century. Cross-listed with HIST3045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Political Theory: 3 Credits

  • POLI3036
    HIST OF AMERICAN VALUES, BELIEFS(HIST3036) |

    POLI3036
    HIST OF AMERICAN VALUES, BELIEFS(HIST3036) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we explore the central values, beliefs and ideas that have helped to both shape and reflect the changing history of the United States. Special attention is paid to how particularly important values and ideas reflected certain time periods in American history, and helped to make this country unique. America's values and beliefs evolved both from social changes and grassroots political movements as well as from its leaders and influential thinkers. Contemporary ideas and values in America are provided considerable attention. Cross-listed with HIST3036 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3070
    THE IDEA OF FREEDOM |

    POLI3070
    THE IDEA OF FREEDOM |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, we explore the concept of freedom, with a view towards appreciating the idea of individual, social and political freedom from multiple analytical perspectives. We will also investigate how the quest for freedom can help to generate new political systems or changes in existing ones. A key goal of the course is to provoke students’ creativity by having to devise their own particularistic notion of freedom, and to try to figure out ways of achieving it. At the same time, it is helpful to survey how the notion of freedom has been defined, used and critiqued by political and social thinkers. We also examine different political systems in an effort to perceive which systems have maximized or encouraged the achievement of freedom (variously defined) and which have minimized or discouraged its realization. And we spend time inquiring into the importance of freedom in the US political system today and how it is being achieved, or how it is being challenged and harmed. Students will be asked to write a series of short assignments in which they begin to develop their own notions of freedom, as well as a longer research paper which explores the potential for realizing their particularized, self-developed notion of freedom. Student evaluation will be based on those assignments and papers as well as on in-class discussion, quizzes and/or exams, and on-line discussion board participation. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3072
    DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISM (HIST3072) |

    POLI3072
    DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISM (HIST3072) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, we will focus on the emergence of Democratic Socialism as a political philosophy that favors a convergence of socially progressive policies with electoral democracy and capitalism. Different political theorists – in France, England, Germany, the U.S. – devised variations on this theme throughout the mid to late 19th century and into the early 20th centuries, and these variations and differing approaches will be analyzed. In addition, the course provides attention to the development of the Democratic Socialist movement in many parts of the world as the 20th century progressed. We will explore the history of this movement as well as suggesting how the political philosophy of Democratic Socialism became modified and contextualized as the movement evolved in practice. And finally, the relatively rapid expansion of the ‘Bernista’ movement in the U.S. in the 2010s will be analyzed. Student requirements include in-class discussion; tests, exams; essays; research papers; discussion board participation. Cross-listed with HIST3072|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3085
    MARXIST POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3085) |

    POLI3085
    MARXIST POLITICAL THOUGHT (HIST3085) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Marxist Political Thought will mostly focus on the ideas, analyses and proposals contained in the writings of Karl Marx and his successors. Considering the extensive dis-information surrounding this body of knowledge, it is important for students to understand the actual notions of political change that Marx himself discussed before turning to other Marxist political theorists and to the study of Communist political movements. Such thinkers as Lenin, Trotsky, Mao, Guevara, Cabral, Marcuse, ‘Danny the Red’ and others all played a large role in promoting Communist ideas and actions and it is important to consider their theoretical contributions. Some attention to Communist regimes (the Soviet Union, China, Cuba) will also be paid.

    PREREQUISITES:

Major Electives -- Public Policy: 3 credits

  • INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of major theories of international political economy including a more detailed understanding of the fast growing economic and institutional infrastructure of the international system. Topics include the development of intergovernmental and non-governmental international organizations (IGOs and NGOs), international treaties and laws governing trade and business practices, and mechanisms for the resolutions of international disputes. Cross-listed with ADMG3003 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG1005

  • POLI2075
    PUBLIC POLICY |

    POLI2075
    PUBLIC POLICY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we study basic concepts and practices of the public policy process, from policy formulation to decision-making and implementation of policies by the government. The United States federal government is the major focus of inquiry although other governments may be referenced. This course is especially appropriate for those interested in knowing how a policy is created and how to analyze government policies. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3025
    DEVELOPMENT:POLITICAL, SOCIAL & ECONOMIC ISSUES(INST3025) |

    POLI3025
    DEVELOPMENT:POLITICAL, SOCIAL & ECONOMIC ISSUES(INST3025) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course presents a study of the political, social, and economic realities of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Emphasis is placed on ecological, racial, ethnic, and population problems, as well as on the legacy of colonialism, developmentalism, and dependency. Human rights and the special problems of women will also be addressed. Cross-listed with INST3025|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3032
    COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY |

    POLI3032
    COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the formation and dissemination of public policy in various countries around the world. We examines the means by which political, economic, and social issues are addressed by governments. The impact of public policy decision-making is critically evaluated and compared among countries.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3051
    DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA (HIST/SOCL3051) |

    POLI3051
    DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA (HIST/SOCL3051) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course looks at the history of social, political and economic development of Southeast Asia, excluding Indochina, and focusing primarily on Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. It will discuss the dependent nature of development of these countries and how such development affects the national historical experiences of these countries. Cross-listed with HIST/SOCL3051|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL1023
    GLOBAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS (SLSO1007) |

    SOCL1023
    GLOBAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS (SLSO1007) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is a study of current social problems that take place across the globe. It emphasizes the application of sociological concepts to the critical analysis of social issues and problems in contemporary societies throughout the world, including the US. Cross-listed with SLSO1007 |

    PREREQUISITES: