Degrees and Requirements

History

The primary objective of the history program is to lead students to a global awareness as well as an understanding of their many heritages. The program also seeks to develop skills that will enable students to enter a variety of professions such as law, teaching, business and government, as well as to prepare them for graduate school.

To complete the history major successfully, the following course work is required:

  • 12 required history credits.
  • 30 major elective credits
  • 44 general elective credits
  • 34 Core Curriculum credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation, the last 30 of which must be earned at La Roche College.

Summary of Requirements

Required Courses: Select 12 credits (At least one course must be in Western Civilization)

  • HIST1010
    US HIST 1607-1865 FOUNDATIONS OF A REPUBLIC |

    HIST1010
    US HIST 1607-1865 FOUNDATIONS OF A REPUBLIC |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the history of the United States from 1607 to 1865. This course traces the development of the United States from the earliest European settlers to the formation of a republic, noting the events, people and ideas involved in the struggle to achieve that end. Particular emphasis is given to colonial America, the American Revolution, the constitutional process of 1789, Native Americans and slavery. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST1011
    US HIST:EMERG OF MASS DEMOCRACY (1865-1945) |

    HIST1011
    US HIST:EMERG OF MASS DEMOCRACY (1865-1945) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the history of the United States from 1865 to 1945. This course traces the development of the United States from the aftermath of the Civil War to its emergence as a world superpower, noting the events, people and ideas involved in that development. Particular emphasis is given to Reconstruction, industrial development and World War II. Cross-listed with SLHS1006 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST1013
    WESTERN CIVILIZATION I(SLHS1004) |

    HIST1013
    WESTERN CIVILIZATION I(SLHS1004) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on Western civilization from its origin in the Near East up through the Protestant Reformation. Special emphasis is given to the social, economic, religious, and political institutions that shaped the roots of Western Civilization. Attention is also concentrated on the place of the individual within this society. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST1014
    WESTERN CIVILIZATION II |

    HIST1014
    WESTERN CIVILIZATION II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on Western civilization from the Reformation to contemporary times. Special emphasis is given to the characteristics which define Western civilization as it emerged from the Middle Ages into modern times including science, faith, reason, capitalism, communism, the growth of institutions and the arts. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SLHS1002
    MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. |

    SLHS1002
    MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we examine the history of different ethnic and racial immigrants in the United States; the process of ethnic assimilation into mainstream American culture; and how different groups and races have been treated by the U.S. government. In addition, we examine the reasons that ethnic and racial groups departed their own countries to emigrate here, and recent immigration experiences and changes in U.S. immigration policy.|

    PREREQUISITES:

Required Electives: 30 credits: History Electives must be at the 2000- or 3000 Level

  • CRIM1003
    UNDERSTANDING THE U.S. CONSTITUTION (POLI1003) |

    CRIM1003
    UNDERSTANDING THE U.S. CONSTITUTION (POLI1003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the U.S. Constitution's role in American society and the philosophical, historical, and political influences on its framers. The course focuses on the structure and content of the Constitution. The course also examines the landmark Supreme Court cases that have shaped American society from 1790 to the present time. Students, through a multimedia approach, will examine those cases and the historical, social, and political factors that were a backdrop to the rulings issued by the Court. Cross-listed with POLI1003|

    PREREQUISITES:

    ENGL1011

  • GLBL4015
    EARLY CANADIAN HISTORY & TALES |

    GLBL4015
    EARLY CANADIAN HISTORY & TALES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An integrated study of the early history of Canada, up to the late 1800s, and the literature and films both from and about those times. Students will begin this study with the times of the first explorers, from Champlain’s books, to the colonization of the land and native people by the French, especially its Catholic missionaries. The course will then transition to the arrival of the British, beginning with the war that expelled French rule but not its colonists in the east, the impact of wars with America (both the Revolution and of 1812), and the push west to the edge of the Prairies. Finally, we will explore the great Artic explorers stories, such as Franklin’s epic and tragic history, the Métis rebellion in the country’s heartland, and the literal nation building accomplished by the cross continental railroad reaching Vancouver, 1871-1885, soon after the nation’s Confederation in 1867.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    JR/SR Status & ENGL1012

  • HIST2XXXX or 3XXX

    HIST2XXXX or 3XXX

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers the key episodes in the history of Africa from pre-colonial times, through the colonial and post-colonial periods. We examine ancient kingdoms, stateless societies, inter-cultural exchanges, ethnicity, empire-creation and state-building. British, French, Belgian, Dutch and Portuguese colonial systems in Africa are then analyzed. We proceed to look at the anti-colonial independence movements, economic development in post-colonial Africa, post-colonial state-building and political changes in present-day Africa.|

    PREREQUISITES: