Degrees and Requirements

International Studies

A major in International Studies is meant to prepare students for career opportunities in international business, public services in international areas of government and diplomacy, international governmental and nongovernmental organizations.

REQUIREMENTS: To successfully complete the International Studies major, the following coursework is required:

• 22 credits as listed under “Major Core Requirements”
•  21 credits of Major Electives (at least 3 credits from each of the three areas of study: Culture and Arts; International Politics and Economy; and Global Studies.  (See linked program guide)
• 11 credits Modern Languages (Waived for non-native Englilsh Speakers; or earned with CLEP Levels 1 and 2 tests with score of 50)
•  37 CORE credits
•  29 General Elective Credits
•  A minimum number of 120 credits are required for degree, the last 30 of which, and 50% of the major must be earned at La Roche College.

Summary of Requirements

International Studies Major Courses - Required: 22 credits

  • ADMG1005
    MACROECONOMICS |

    ADMG1005
    MACROECONOMICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introductory economics course focusing on the field of macroeconomics, including government spending, money, inflation, unemployment and taxes. Also included are brief sections on microeconomic and economic systems.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST2003
    INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES |

    INST2003
    INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of international studies. It is designed to acquaint students with major trends and key themes in global and international issues today. Students will discuss the origins and development of the field, along with theories and concepts relevant to the study of international issues. There will also be an emphasis on the impact of globalization on various aspects of social, political, and economic life, including development, culture, health, food, security, and the environment.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3011
    RESEARCH METHODS(SOCL3011) |

    INST3011
    RESEARCH METHODS(SOCL3011) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces the student to the design of explanatory models in the field of international relations, methods for literature surveys and more commonly used quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. Cross-listed with SOCL3011 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1040

  • INST3025
    DEVELOPMENT:POLITICAL,SOCIAL & ECONOMIC ISSUES(POLI3025) |

    INST3025
    DEVELOPMENT:POLITICAL,SOCIAL & ECONOMIC ISSUES(POLI3025) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the political, social, and economic realities of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Emphasis is placed on ecological, racial, ethnic, and population problems, as well as on the legacy of colonialism, developmentalism, and dependency. Human rights and special problems of women will also be addressed. Cross-listed with POLI3025 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST4055
    SENIOR SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (SOCL4055) |

    INST4055
    SENIOR SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (SOCL4055) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is the capstone course for all international studies students. It will be the vehicle for students to synthesize their knowledge of international relations through the development of individual research endeavors in a special topic relevant to their respective concentration areas. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and share their research with fellow students in a seminar format. Cross-listed with SOCL4055|

    PREREQUISITES:

    Reserved for JR/SR Only

  • MATH1040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS |

    MATH1040
    PROBABILITY & STATISTICS |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The study of the fundamentals of probability theory with applications to natural and social sciences as well as to mathematics. Discrete and continuous distributions, sampling theory, linear correlation, regression, statistical inference, estimation and analysis of variance are included.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MATH1010

  • SASUxxxx

    SASUxxxx

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL2070
    CULTURE & HUMAN SOCIETIES |

    SOCL2070
    CULTURE & HUMAN SOCIETIES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Sociological study of what we mean by culture is taken and critically applied to the discussion of global-historical transformations in human social development, from the period of simple societies to the present age of complex, industrial, and globalized societies.|

    PREREQUISITES:

International Studies Major Electives: 21 Credits

  • CMET2003
    COMMUNICATION BETWEEN CULTURES |

    CMET2003
    COMMUNICATION BETWEEN CULTURES |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course begins with a focus study on communication factors which affect any cross-cultural interpersonal interaction. The students then survey specific differences between U.S. cultural customs and those of countries presently involved in La Roche's Pacem In Terris Institute. Finally, the role of the media in intercultural relations is discussed.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • ENGL2022
    WORLD LITERATURE II(SLLT1010) |

    ENGL2022
    WORLD LITERATURE II(SLLT1010) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of world literature from the Early Modern era (c. 1600) to the present. Issues to be covered include the relationship of global imperialism to World literary traditions; the rise of literatures of resistance; and the major schools of contemporary literary theory. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of important works of world literature. Cross-listed with SLLT1010 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GEOG3010
    CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY & THE HUMAN MOSAIC(INST3010) |

    GEOG3010
    CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY & THE HUMAN MOSAIC(INST3010) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The many ways in which humans have changed the face of the earth in response to culture is known as the human mosaic. The course applies the major themes of cultural geography to population, language, religion, agriculture and urbanism. A basic knowledge of world geography is assumed. Cross-listed with INST3010|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • GEOG3013
    GEOGRAPHY & WORLD AFFAIRS (INST3013) |

    GEOG3013
    GEOGRAPHY & WORLD AFFAIRS (INST3013) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of various regions of the world and the environmental conditions to which people adapt. Racial, linguistic, religious and economic groupings of people will be stressed. Current world events are examined to develop knowledge about historical, geographic, climatic, political and religious environments which people inhabit. Cross-listed with INST3013 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY(INST3028) |

    HIST3028
    EAST ASIAN HISTORY(INST3028) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of the history of Korea, Japan, China, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Malaysia. The domestic, political, social, and economic bases of the historical development of these nations will be considered. Political influences of other world powers will be considered. Cross-listed with INST3028|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • HIST3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (POLI3045) |

    HIST3045
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF MID EAST (POLI3045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course explores the peoples and history of the Middle East, from ancient times, including a procession of impressive empires, until their eventual domination by the Ottomans and finally, by British Empire. We investigate the accommodation of the British to Middle Eastern kingships and the impact of colonial state-building. We proceed to examine the establishment of the state of Israel and the evolution of Palestinian-Israeli relations over past half a century. Cross-listed with POLI3045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INMT3039
    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MGMT |

    INMT3039
    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MGMT |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An introduction to international business management with particular emphasis on the field of international finance and economics. In addition, the course deals with problems in the area of finance, marketing, production and organization, both from the perspective of the multinational corporation and the domestic corporation trading in international markets.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(POLI2001) |

    INST2001
    GLOBAL POLITICS(POLI2001) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This is an introductory course in the field of international relations, providing an overview of major theories and concepts of international relations and an historical background for contemporary world politics. Major topics include the contemporary international system, economic development, foreign policy behavior, international conflicts and international institutions. Cross-listed with POLI2001|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST2011
    WORLD GEOGRAPHY(GEOG2011) |

    INST2011
    WORLD GEOGRAPHY(GEOG2011) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A study of the interactions between human beings and the land, and the influence of geography in shaping work and culture throughout the world. Cross-listed with GEOG2011 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    INST3003
    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (ADMG3003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    An overview of major theories of international political economy including a more detailed understanding of the fast growing economic and institutional infrastructure of the international system. Topics include the development of intergovernmental and non-governmental international organizations (IGOs and NGOs), international treaties and laws governing trade and business practices, and mechanisms for the resolutions of international disputes. Cross-listed with ADMG3003 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG1005

  • INST3021
    COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT(POLI3021) |

    INST3021
    COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT(POLI3021) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course focuses on the government, policies and politics of different nation-states around the world, and investigates the political science approaches to studying government and politics in different parts of the world. The focus in not only on forms of governments, but also the major political and social factors that affect political change in different world areas, the relationship between states and societies, and the comparative study of democratic and non-democratic nations. Cross-listed with POLI3021 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3027
    HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE (HIST3027) |

    INST3027
    HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE (HIST3027) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey of modern European history (beginning with the turn of the century) that is intended to provide global awareness and an appreciation of the accomplishments of other cultures. This course also provides a particular perspective of the American way of life as it has been influenced by European cultures. Cross-listed with HIST3027 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST3033
    AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (POLI3033) |

    INST3033
    AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (POLI3033) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    The reasons behind the foreign policy decisions of the U.S. government in recent decades are examined; different theories are explored for explaining shifts and continuities in foreign policy decision-making. Contemporary challenges to American foreign policy, from Iraq and security threats to peace-making efforts in the Middle East, are analyzed. Cross-listed with POLI3033|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST4048
    INTERNATIONAL LEGAL ENVIRONMENT (INMT4048) |

    INST4048
    INTERNATIONAL LEGAL ENVIRONMENT (INMT4048) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course introduces concepts of international laws of contracts, sales and negotiable instruments. It also provides an overview of problems related to dispute settlement in international business and governmental administrative conflicts that restrict commerce between residents of different nations. Cross-listed with INMT4048 |

    PREREQUISITES:

    ADMG2009 & JR/SR Status

  • INST4051

    INST4051

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

  • INST4057

    INST4057

    Credits (Min/Max): /

    PREREQUISITES:

    JR/SR Status & permission of supervising faculty member & student's academic advisor

  • POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    POLI3019
    HISTORY & POLITICS OF AFRICA |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course covers the key episodes in the history of Africa from pre-colonial times, through the colonial and post-colonial periods. We examine ancient kingdoms, stateless societies, inter-cultural exchanges, ethnicity, empire-creation and state-building. British, French, Belgian, Dutch and Portuguese colonial systems in Africa are then analyzed. We proceed to look at the anti-colonial independence movements, economic development in post-colonial Africa, post-colonial state-building and political changes in present-day Africa.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • RELS1003
    WORLD RELIGIONS(SLRS1003) |

    RELS1003
    WORLD RELIGIONS(SLRS1003) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the historical development together with the religious beliefs and practices of the major religions of the world including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Zoroastrianism. The teachings of each religion regarding the Absolute, the world, the nature of humans, the problem facing humans, the solution of the problem for humans, Community and Ethics, Rituals and Symbols, and what happens after death will be studied. The course also includes an examination of the beginnings of religion in human history as well as the characteristics of tribal and national religions. Cross-listed with SLRS1003. Class starts the week of 09/10/2018|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • RELS2020
    WOMEN & RELIGION(SLRS1014) |

    RELS2020
    WOMEN & RELIGION(SLRS1014) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    A survey of woman's place in society, past and present, as it has been and is affected by religious teachings, laws and customs and examination of the attitudes toward women in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, in the writing of the early church fathers, the Protestant Reformers, and in the current religious structures of Catholics, Protestants, and Jews. Cross-listed with SLRS1014 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL2022
    SPORTS & GLOBALIZATION |

    SOCL2022
    SPORTS & GLOBALIZATION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    Using sociological theories and concepts, this course analyzes how society defines and organizes sports. This course also looks at how sports as a (local and globalized) social activity influences important aspects of our lives such as family, education, politics, the economy, media, and religion. It also examines how sports participation affects our ideas about, among other things, gender, class, ethnicity, conformity, and violence.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST2045/POLI2045) |

    SOCL2045
    ISLAM IN THE WORLD (HIST2045/POLI2045) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course, the basic beliefs of Islam are reviewed, along with a brief history of Islam's overall development and its impact on the world and on various civilizations in different global regions. Islam's internal sects are analyzed, and its political impact on current politics in the world is explored. The role of U.S. foreign policy in dealing with the recent rise of Islam is also analyzed. Cross-listed with HIST/POLI2045 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3040
    ETHNIC CONFLICT(POLI3040) |

    SOCL3040
    ETHNIC CONFLICT(POLI3040) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    In this course we examine why ethnic groups sometimes get along very well, but other times engage in conflict. We query: What are the political and social origins of ethnic conflicts in various parts of the world? Do ethnic conflicts differ in different world regions? What national and international policies encourage ethnic conflict? How can we encourage ethnic groups to pursue peaceful accommodations? Cross-listed with POLI3040 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3041
    CITIES & GLOBALIZATION |

    SOCL3041
    CITIES & GLOBALIZATION |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the social dynamics of urbanization, urban social structure, and urban development. It analyzes, through various theories of urban sociology, the city as a form of social organization and as centers of economic and political processes. It also looks at how globalization has impacted various cities around the world in terms of their growths and declines.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3051
    DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA (HIST/POLI3051) |

    SOCL3051
    DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA (HIST/POLI3051) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course looks at the history of social, political and economic development of Southeast Asia, excluding Indochina, and focusing primarily on Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. It will discuss the contingent and dependent nature of development of these countries under the larger framework of global capitalism, and how such development affects the national historical experiences of these countries. Cross-listed with HIST/POLI3025 |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3081
    ENVIRONMENT & SOCIETY |

    SOCL3081
    ENVIRONMENT & SOCIETY |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course is designed to provide an approach to study and analyze the interactions between society and the environment, and the political economic impacts of environmental problems. Focus will be on both the social causes of and social responses to various environmental problems, at the local, national, and global levels.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • SOCL3082
    SOCIAL MOVEMENT & RESISTANCE (POLI3082) |

    SOCL3082
    SOCIAL MOVEMENT & RESISTANCE (POLI3082) |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    This course examines the origin, growth, and dynamics of social movements as forms of social protest and resistance against state and global injustices. Discussions include case studies of various social and political groups, non-government organizations, and liberation and revolutionary movements in the US and throughout the world. Cross-listed with POLI3082 |

    PREREQUISITES:

International Studies Modern Langauge Requirement: 11 credits (in the same modern language)

  • MLFR1001
    ELEMENTARY FRENCH I |

    MLFR1001
    ELEMENTARY FRENCH I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    This course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in beginning French. The goal of the course is the acquisitions of a useful, communicative command of the language at the Novice-Mid to Novice-High level on the national scale, as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real-life language tasks or functions (conversing with an exchange student, completing forms, etc.) and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MLFR1002
    ELEMENTARY FRENCH II |

    MLFR1002
    ELEMENTARY FRENCH II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    As a continuation of Elementary French I, this course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in beginning French.

    The goal of the course is the acquisitions of a useful, communicative command of the language at a Novice Mid to Intermediate Low level on the national scale, as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target-language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real-life language tasks or functions (e.e., conversing with an exchange student, making grocery lists, completing forms, etc.), and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought, and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MLFR1001

  • MLFR2001
    INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I |

    MLFR2001
    INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    These courses are designed to build on the student's previous skills, thereby improving oral proficiency. Vocabulary acquisition and the reading of authentic aural and written materials broaden the student's knowledge and linguistic abilities. Classroom activities focus on development of skill in self-expression. The student has many opportunities to expand cultural knowledge through films, videotapes, and informal rendezvous. Course is not open to students with an advanced or superior oral proficiency level in French.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MLFR1002

  • MLIT1001
    ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I |

    MLIT1001
    ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    This course is designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the beginning Italian. The goal of the course is the acquisition of a useful, communicative command of language at the Novice-Low to Novice-Mid level on the national scale, as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and the Educational Testing Service (ETS).This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real- life language tasks or functions (conversing with an exchange student, completing forms, etc.) and the exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MLIT1002
    ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II |

    MLIT1002
    ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    As a continuation of Elementary Italian I, this course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in beginning Italian. The goal of the course is the acquisitions of a useful, communicative command of the language at a Novice Mid to Intermediate Low level on the national scale, as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target-language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real-life language tasks or functions (i.e., conversing with an exchange student, making grocery lists, completing forms, etc.), and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought, and customs. |

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MLIT2001
    INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I |

    MLIT2001
    INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    As a continuation of Elementary Italian II, this course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in intermediate Italian. The goal of the course is the acquisition of a useful, communicative command of the language at the Novice High to Intermediate Low level on the national scale as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target-language tasks of functions (e.g., ordering a meal, making travel arrangements, visiting a doctor's office, etc.) and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MLSP1001
    ELEMENTARY SPANISH I |

    MLSP1001
    ELEMENTARY SPANISH I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    This course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in beginning Spanish. The goal of the course is the acquisitions of a useful, communicative command of the language at the Novice-Mid to Novice-High level on the national scale, as estabilshed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real-life language tasks or functions (conversing with an exchange student, completing forms, etc.) and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

  • MLSP1002
    ELEMENTARY SPANISH II |

    MLSP1002
    ELEMENTARY SPANISH II |

    Credits (Min/Max): 4/4

    As a continuation of Elementary Spanish I, this course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in beginning Spanish. The goal of the course is the acquistions of a useful, communicative command of the language at a Novice Mid to Intermediate Low level on the national scale, as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target-language input (oral and visual), active oral and written practice of real-life language tasks or functions (e.e., conversing with an exchange student, making grocery lists, completing forms, etc.), and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought, and customs. |

    PREREQUISITES:

    MLSP1001

  • MLSP2001
    INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I |

    MLSP2001
    INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I |

    Credits (Min/Max): 3/3

    As a continuation of Elementary Spanish II, this course is part of a proficiency-based language program designed to provide maximum opportunities for students to develop functional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in intermediate Spanish. The goal of the course is the acquisition of a useful, communicative command of the language at the Novice High to Intermediate Low level on the national scale as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Educational Testing Service. This goal will be realized through maximum exposure to authentic target-language tasks of functions (e.g., ordering a meal, making travel arrangements, visiting a doctor's office, etc.) and exploration of cultural subtleties conveyed by language, thought and customs.|

    PREREQUISITES:

    MLSP1002