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Course numbers that start with "E"

  • EAPP0100
    EAPP - SPEAKING AND LISTENING 1
  • EAPP0101
    EAPP - READING AND WRITING 1
  • EAPP0102
    EAPP - GRAMMAR 1
  • EAPP0110
    EAPP - GRAMMAR 2
  • EAPP1010
    EAPP - SPEAKING AND LISTENING 2
  • EAPP1011
    EAPP - READING AND WRITING 2
  • EDEL2010
    OBSERVATION 1 (PreK)
    This class will provide the student with the opportunity to work with a teacher in a pre-school setting/classroom. This field work will coincide with the classes of Child Development, Educational Psychology, and Orientation to PreK-4 Education. This will allow the student to connect the theory gained in these classes to practice in the early childhood classroom according to PA learning standards. Field Experience: 36 total hours (6 hours Stage 2 and 30 hours Stage 3 field experience).
  • EDEL2020
    OBSERVATION II (K-4)
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course will provide the student with the opportunity to work with a teacher in a kindergarten to fourth grade classroom. This field work will allow the student to connect the theory gained in Child Development, Educational Psychology, and Orientation to PreK-4 Education classes to practice in the classroom according to PA learning standards. Seminars will be in integral part of the class to discuss what the student is observing, provide additional support, and theory to the student. Field Experience: 36 total hours (6 hours Stage 2 and 30 hours Stage 3 field experience).
  • EDEL2030
    METHODS OF TEACHING HEALTH &
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER The course will focus on the importance of proper health and physical activities, according to the Pennsylvania early learning standards, for PreK-4th grade students of all ability ranges and from different cultures in an inclusive classroom. Students will be provided with introductory experiences in physical education, health, and assessment of student performance. Students will design and practice teaching methods for physical education/health activities for the PreK-4 grades. An integral part of this course will be a field experience in a variety of classrooms across the PreK-4 grade span to observe teachers presenting physical education/health lessons. Field Experience: 4 hours of Stage 1 Field Experience.
  • EDEL3015
    CREATIVE THINKING: METHODS OF
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This class will present strategies and teaching techniques for integrating art and music across the curriculum, aligned with the Pennsylvania early learning standards, for students in the PreK-4 grades of all ability ranges and from different cultures in an inclusive classroom. Students will be provided with introductory experiences in art and music and assessment of student performance. Students will design and practice teaching methods to incorporate art and music into content areas across the PreK-4 curriculum. An integral part of this course will be a field experience in a variety of classrooms across the PreK-4 grade span to observe teachers who incorporate art and music into their lessons. Field Experience: 4 hours of Stage 1 Field Experience.
  • EDEL3025
    METHODS OF TEACHING WRITING
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course will provide opportunities for you to learn how to teach PreK-4 students to learn to write for a variety of purposes, based on the Pennsylvania academic standards and assessment anchors. You will learn how to use backwards-design to create lessons that focus on student growth areas, and how to assess writing samples to inform further instruction. In this process you will also learn how to improve your own writing so that you can serve as a model for your students. You will be expected to demonstrate model handwriting for printing and cursive.
  • EDEL3035
    METHODS OF TEACHING READING
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course provides the foundation for teaching reading according to PA academic standards and assessment anchors for PreK through grade 4, for students with a broad range of abilities and diverse cultural backgrounds. The focus is on research-based instruction around the Five Big Ideas of Reading: fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, phonemic awareness and the alphabetic principle. Strategies for dealing with struggling readers will be emphasized, and you will learn to differentiate your reading instruction for students reading above-, on-, and below-level. This will be exciting, intense, hands-on work that will teach you to understand reading in a whole new way.
  • EDEL3045
    TEACHING READING & LANGUAGE ARTS
    This course provides a weekly supervised practicum and seminar. This offers a supportive, scaffolded, first step into teaching. Students will be teaching reading and language arts in a PreK-4th grade level classroom. Instructional topics will be assigned by classroom mentor teachers. Topics will address the grade-level standards for reading, writing, speaking and listening. Practicum students will use assessment information to design lessons, and differentiate instruction to meet student needs. Throughout the practicum, students will be able to demonstrate effective reading and language arts instruction, and promote skill development in early elementary students. The primary objective of this course is for students to practice planning and implementing standards-based reading and language arts instruction that is very interactive, and differentiated for student strengths and needs. Field Experience: 15 hours of Stage 3 Field Experience
  • EDEL3055
    METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL
    This class will provide the pre-service PreK-4 teacher with strategies and techniques for teaching social studies in a heterogeneous inclusive classroom according to PA early learning standards and the National Council for the Social Studies thematic strands, which include the disciplines of geography, history, economics, and civics and government. Emphasis will be on organizing subject matter and translating it to children through a variety of methods which address different learning styles. An integral part of the course will be a field placement experience in a PreK-4 classroom. This field placement will allow the student to connect theory to practice and provide an experience of working with children. Field Experience: 10 hours of Stage 3 field experience (teaching Junior Achievement)
  • EDEL4035
    METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This class will provide the pre-service PreK-4 teacher with strategies and techniques for teaching science in a heterogeneous inclusive classroom according to PA learning standards and the National Science Teachers Association utilizing a 'hands-on' approach. Emphasis will be on organizing subject matter including environment and ecology, life sciences, physical sciences, and earth and space science, and translating it to children through the students' participation in various methods of learning. The student will present a demonstration lesson utilizing the inquiry lesson plan format to his/her peers. An integral part of this course will be a field experience in a PreK-4 classroom. This field placement will allow the student to connect theory to practice and provide an experience of working with children. Field Experience: 10 hours of Stage 3 field experience
  • EDEL4040
    METHODS OF TEACHING MATH PREK-4
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course provides the theoretical base of principles for teaching math according to PA learning standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics to students from infancy through grade 4, inclusive of special needs and gifted children. It will enable the student to learn mathematical concepts, skills, and problem solving methods through the use of manipulatives and be able to demonstrate this knowledge through demonstration lessons to his/her peers. Through the experiences provided, the student will gain knowledge in the various strategies for the use of these manipulatives, the selection of effective materials and techniques, and diagnostic procedures.
  • EDEL4045
    TEACHING MATH PRACTICUM PREK-4
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL4040, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course provides a weekly supervised practicum and seminar based on the Methods of Teaching Math course. The student will be assigned a class or a small group of students where he/she will diagnose the students' needs and then create and implement lessons weekly according to PA learning standards that focus on the diagnosis found. The student will be able to demonstrate and promote effective strategies for teaching children of all ability ranges in his/her lessons plans and teaching. The student will spend one period a week in a classroom teaching and this will be accompanied with a seminar focusing on the plans and teaching that is implemented weekly. Field Experience: 15 hours of Stage 3 Field Experience
  • EDEL4060
    INTEGRATING CURRICULUM &
    PREREQUISITE: EDEL2000, GRADE OF C OR BETTER In the final stages of preparing participants to enter the teaching profession, this class acts as the capstone of the program prior to student teaching. This course will offer the participants opportunities to connect the various methods courses and strategies learned. Participants will learn and practice ways to integrate different subject areas into a cohesive unit using projects, and to provide cognitively engaging instruction for students of many ability levels and learning styles in an inclusive setting. As always, instruction will be planned according to PA learning standards. The course will also address the duties of the teaching profession that extend beyond daily instruction, which includes providing opportunities to learn and practice strategies for working with families and keeping them engaged in their children's education. Participants will invest significant professional development hours in preparing the assignments of this course, including some materials useful during student teaching.
  • EDEL4075
    STUDENT TEACHING & SEMINAR
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC4005, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course provides PreK-4 teacher candidates with the opportunity to incorporate various strategies and techniques learned from the methods courses to implement effective instruction for all learners during an eight-week supervised student teaching placement in a PreK-4th grade classroom. Under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a university supervisor, the student teacher will have the opportunity to teach in all the subject areas and demonstrate the instructional practices and methods related to the developmental level of their students, based on a standards aligned system. The student teacher will reflect on their experiences and participate in student teaching seminars.
  • EDEL4080
    STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR
  • EDEL4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - PREK-4
  • EDML2010
    ML TEACHING SCIENCE METHODS-LAB
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course is required for all middle level education majors. The course will focus on how to use an inquiry approach to teach science in the 4th-6th grade levels, with an emphasis on how to address the Pennsylvania Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors for Science & Technology and Environment & Ecology. A field experience is a required component of this course.
  • EDML2023
    ML TEACHING MATHEMATICS METHODS
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course is required for all middle level education majors. The course will focus on how to use a learner based approach to teach math in the 4th-6th grade levels, with an emphasis on how to address the Pennsylvania Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors for Mathematics. A field experience is a required component of this course.
  • EDML3010
    DEVELOPING READING COMMUNITIES
    This course engages students in a study of the relationship between literacy and community by examining a range of "reading communities," including historical, school-based, professional, neighborhood, workplace, and recreational communities. Key issues will include: how communities use literacy and literacy practices, how literacy practices define and shape communities, how literacy practices draw and transcend boundaries between communities, and how new literacies transform older communities and create new kinds of communities.
  • EDML3013
    ML TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course is required for all middle level education majors. The course will focus on how to present social studies concepts in a hands-on manner to 4th-6th grade students, with an emphasis on how to address the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Geography, History, Economics, and Civics & Government. A field experience is a required component of this course.
  • EDML3050
    READING AND WRITING ACROSS THE
    Reading and Writing Across the Disciplines introduces a wide variety of effective instructional methods for middle level and secondary teachers to present reading and writing skills in any content area.
  • EDML4010
    ADVANCED TEACHING METHODS FOR
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course is required for all middle level education majors, in order to prepare for student teaching. Future middle level teachers will explore ways to engage students in the learning process, with a focus in the content areas at the 7th and 8th grade level. Future teachers will plan lessons and units based on content standards and assessment anchors. The use of technology will also be explored as a way to enhance instruction and assessment. A field experience is a required component of this course.
  • EDML4050
    ML STUDENT TEACHING (GRADES 4-6)
    PREREQUISITE: EDML4010 AND EDUC4005, GRADE OF C OR BETTER During this portion of student teaching, middle level education majors will be placed in a 4th-6th grade setting, and may be expected to teach any subject area (science, mathematics, language arts, or social studies) for approximately seven weeks. Student teachers will be expected to demonstrate instructional strategies that capitalize on the developmental characteristics of young adolescents and to design successful interventions responsive to the needs of individual middle level students. Student teachers will be supervised by a cooperating teacher and a LRU supervisor, and will be expected to participate in collaborative team building opportunities. Part of the student teaching experience will also include an on campus student teaching seminar, where topics such as certification requirements, school law, and interviewing strategies will be presented.
  • EDML4055
    ML STUDENT TEACHING (GRADES 7-8)
    PREREQUISITE: EDML4010 AND EDUC4005, GRADE OF C OR BETTER During this portion of student teaching, middle level education majors will be placed in a 7th-8th grade setting within their content specialty (science, mathematics, language arts, or social studies) for approximately seven weeks. Student teachers will be expected to demonstrate their deep content knowledge as they apply instructional strategies that capitalize on the developmental characteristics of young adolescents and to design successful interventions responsive to the needs of individual middle level students. Student teachers will be supervised by a cooperating teacher and a LRU supervisor, and will be expected to participate in collaborative team building opportunities. Part of the student teaching experience will also include an on campus student teaching seminar, where topics such as certification requirements, school law, and interviewing strategies will be presented.
  • EDML4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - EDUCATION
  • EDSP2015
    INTRO TO HIGH INCIDENCE
    This course provides students an opportunity to explore foundations of special education in the United States including: characteristics of each disability category, legislation, over-representation of diverse students, academic and functional needs of students with disabilities, individual learning differences, least restrictive environment, implications for a Standards Aligned System, collaboration and transition. Students will develop an understanding of Accommodations and Adaptations for inclusive environments.
  • EDSP2025
    LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS AND
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP2015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course will introduce students to behavior and misbehaviors of students in the school setting, types of misbehavior roles, establish a classroom management plan that will reflect their consideration of students with disabilities, problem solving, conflict resolution, assessing appropriate and problematic behaviors while establishing opportunities for students with diverse backgrounds to interact and share in cooperative learning groups, problem solving to achieve common goals. "Application Models" will be the framework used to demonstrate the approaches used by pioneers as well as 21st century researchers and educators.
  • EDSP3010
    LITERACY INSTRUCTION AND
    This course provides the foundation for teaching reading according to PA learning standards for students with a broad range of abilities and diverse cultural backgrounds. The course emphasizes research-based instructional approaches and interventions for Middle and Secondary level students including word level instruction, text level comprehension, reading-writing connection, and assessment. A field experience is a required component of this course.
  • EDSP3015
    INTRO TO LOW INCIDENCE
    This course is designed to prepare students with the skills necessary to effectively teach individuals with severe disabilities, identify the relationships of organizations to school systems, laws and policies that are related to the implementation of specialized health care in the educational setting, and demonstrate the knowledge and understanding of individuals so as to develop effective instructional plans that will contribute to effective programs.
  • EDSP3025
    EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP2015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER The Instructional Strategies Course identifies and implements instructional strategies for all individuals with disabilities by evidenced-based methods, specialized resources, multiple instructional approaches, appropriate adaptations and technology, integrating student initiated learning opportunities and experiences into ongoing instruction. Teach learning strategies and modify the pace of instruction within and across curricula, demonstrate efficient differentiated instruction, efficient planning, coordination, and delivery for effective instruction required for inclusive settings.
  • EDSP3035
    SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP2015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course provides a special education field experience placement and seminar based on the Effective Instructional Strategies course. The student will be assigned a class or a small group of students where he/she will create and implement lessons weekly according to the students’ IEP, learning needs, and PA learning standards. The student will demonstrate and promote effective strategies for teaching children of all ability ranges in his/her lessons plans and teaching. The student will spend one period a week teaching in a classroom. This will be accompanied with a seminar focusing on the plans and teaching that is implemented weekly.
  • EDSP3040
    EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This required course for all education majors will explore the instructional purposes for a variety of assessment strategies, such as: authentic, screening, diagnostic, formative, benchmark, and summative assessments. Future teachers will learn how to interpret assessment data, such as standardized test scores and norms, and will practice how to communicate assessment results to educational stakeholders, while considering legal and ethical issues related to assessment data, such as maintaining confidentiality. Future teachers will also create sample assessments that target academic standards and assessment anchors within subject areas, in order to measure mastery of the curriculum in more than one way.
  • EDSP4010
    TRANSITION PLANNING FOR
    The focus of this course is to prepare the Special Education Teacher Candidate with an authentic overview of the transition process for secondary students with disabilities through field experience, informational sessions, and interactive online coursework. The course emphasizes evidence-based best practices with a focus on self-determination and self-advocacy to help students plan and prepare for life after high school in the areas of post-secondary education, employment and independent living.
  • EDSP4015
    DEVELOPMENT OF THE IEP AND
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP2015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER The focus of this culminating course is to prepare the student teacher with a realistic overview of teaching special education in Pennsylvania. The student will create an IEP, become familiar with Inclusion and collaboration, write reflections based on current issues/trends in special education, participate in discussions, create useful artifacts, discuss significant court cases, and understand Transition. The student will also comprehend the special education continuum of services available to the identified student.
  • EDSP4057
    INDEPENDENT STUDY - EDUCATION
  • EDSP4065
    SPECIAL ED STUDENT TEACHING
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP4015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER The Special Education Student Teaching Course is designed to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply skills learned in professional practice, human development, learning environments, instructional strategies, instructional planning, diversity, adaptations and accommodations, collaboration, behavior management, and assessment in a PreK-6th grade special education placement. Under the supervision of a school district cooperating teacher(s) and a La Roche University supervisor, the teacher candidate will design, implement and evaluate lessons that appropriately address the IEP goals and meet the PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors. Student teachers will demonstrate skills that include, but are not be limited to: differentiated instruction, universal design, collaborative teaching, transition planning and research based data driven instruction to meet the needs of all students.
  • EDSP4070
    SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENT
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP4015, GRADE OF C OR BETTER The Special Education Student Teaching Course is designed to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply skills learned in professional practice, human development, learning environments, instructional strategies, instructional planning, diversity, adaptations and accommodations, collaboration, behavior management, assessment, and transition in a 7-12 grade special education placement. Under the supervision of a school district cooperating teacher(s) and a La Roche University supervisor, the teacher candidate will design, implement and evaluate lessons that appropriately address the IEP goals and meet the PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors. Student teachers will demonstrate skills that include, but are not be limited to: differentiated instruction, universal design, collaborative teaching, transition planning and research based data driven instruction to meet the needs of all students.
  • EDSP4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - EDUCATION
  • EDSP5010
    CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION
    The purpose of this graduate course is to prepare MAT candidates to be well-informed educators by investigating current trends and issues in education. A core set of topics will be explored in depth, including developments in curriculum and instruction, legal policies, new technology, ethical principles, and standards for practice. Additional content may be added in response to new issues or student expressed interests. MAT candidates will prepare to become informed consumers of eductional research by learning to evaluate the strength of the research articles and analyzing research trends to identify effective practices for working with all young adolescents.
  • EDSP5015
    CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SPECIAL
    The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Masters Degree candidates to be well-informed special educators by investigating current trends and issues in special education, and some of their historical roots. A core set of topics will be explored in depth that could build toward leadership in the field, including developments in curriculum and instruction, legal policies, new technology, ethical principles, and standards for practice. Additional content may be added in response to new issues or student-expressed interests. Students will prepare to become informed consumers of educational research by learning to evaluate the strength of the research articles describing trends and issues. Students will learn to analyze research and trends to identify effective practices for working with individuals with exceptionalities and their families.
  • EDSP5020
    ASSESSMENT FOR DATA BASED
    The purpose of this graduate course is to prepare MAT candidates to use data to guide their instruction, with valid and reliable assessment practices to promote equitable learning environments for all students. This course will focus on designing and implementing assessments to evaluate the effectiveness of instructional practices and programs, including the procedure for creating and maintaining Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).
  • EDSP5025
    COLLABORATING WITH FAMILIES AND
    The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Master's Degree Candidates to collaborate with all stakeholders to enhance educational opportunities for students with special needs. This course will focus on effective communication skills and culturally responsive practices that can be used to interact in a professional and ethical manner with families and community agencies.
  • EDSP5030
    READING INSTRUCTION FOR STUDENTS
    The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Masters Degree candidates to understand how processing differences effect reading, and how to provide the explicit, systematic instruction needed by students with high-incidence exceptionalities. The course will provide research-based recommendations for both instruction in the five essential skill areas of reading and measures to assess and monitor students' progress. Participants will also learn how to evaluate instructional effectiveness and adapt instruction, differentiate instruction for diverse groups of students, and provide differentiated instruction through a Response to Intervention and Instruction (RTII) model. Practice opportunities will be provided for application of course concepts. The course will maintain a strong emphasis on helping participants to establish best practices for effective reading instruction for students with exceptionalities.
  • EDSP5035
    RESEARCH METHODS
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5015, GRADE OF B OR BETTER The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Masters Degree candidates to become critical consumers of educational research, and to conduct research projects. The course is highly interactive, designed to help participants apply many of the examined quantitative and qualitative practices by analyzing research reports and planning research projects. Emphasis will be placed on exposure to the breadth of research possible in the educational field.
  • EDSP5040
    INTRO TO EDUCATION OF PERSONS
    This introductory course fulfills part of the requirements for those wishing to obtain an ASD Endorsement from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. It is designed to provide students with an overview of characteristics and learning traits, classification systems, assessment strategies/issues, approaches, and interventions related to individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Special emphasis is placed on collaboration, adapting instruction and use of evidence based interventions. Specific attention will be devoted to review of the Comprehensive Autism Assessment Planning System and principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. Field experiences are embedded in this course.
  • EDSP5045
    ADVANCED STUDIES IN BEHAVIOR
    This course fulfills part of the requirements for those wishing to obtain an ASD Endorsement from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This course provides an in-depth review of applied behavior analytic techniques including: conducting behavioral assessments, completing environmental assessments and making adaptations, designing effective behavior change programs, and applying behavioral procedures consonant with ethical standards. Teachers will learn to apply behavior analytic principles toward the improvement of socially significant behaviors in a wide range of settings as well as to evaluate the effects of behavioral procedures. Functional Behavior Assessments (FBA), behavior supports, antecedent management, and encouraging positive alternative behaviors and crisis management will be addressed. Evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies will be emphasized. This course will equip teachers to design instruction and supports in order to encourage positive changes in classroom behavior. Field Experiences are embedded in this course.
  • EDSP5050
    COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL SKILLS
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5040, GRADE OF B OR BETTER This course on communication and social skills instruction fulfills part of the requirements for those wishing to obtain an ASD Endorsement from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. It addresses normal language and communication development and the language development of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Teachers will examine the language-behavior connection, how language delays can lead to social incompetence, and how language can be supplemented with augmentative and alternative interventions. Specific research validated instructional strategies focusing on the assessment and development of social and academic language skills are emphasized. This course explores assistive technology as a research supported tool to improve access to and participation in the general education curriculum. In addition, students will integrate assistive technology in lesson planning to meet students' individual needs. Field experiences are embedded in this course.
  • EDSP5055
    ADVANCED TOPICS FOR PERSONS WITH
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5045, GRADE OF B OR BETTER This course on advanced issues related to autism fulfills part of the requirements for those wishing to obtain an ASD Endorsement from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. In addition to completing a field experience upon completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the variety of programming options available to children and families, discuss non-traditional methods and interventions related to past and present etiologies and treatments of autism including efficacy research; complete research on social skills programs for students with an ASD in order to be able to advocate for social skills programming; complete an intervention assessment tool and create specially designed instruction for a student on the spectrum, and additionally reflect on issues that affect both children with the diagnosis and their families. Field experiences are embedded in this course.
  • EDSP5097
    EDUCATION - DIRECTED STUDY
  • EDSP6010
    LITERACY INSTRUCTION FOR DIVERSE
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5020, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This graduate course focuses on how processing differences affect literacy, and how to provide the explicit, systematic instruction needed by diverse learners. The course will provide research-based recommendations for instruction in writing and the five essential components of reading as well as measures to assess and monitor students' progress. MAT candidates will learn to evaluate instructional effectiveness and adapt instruction, how to differentiate instruction for diverse groups of students, and how to provide differentiated instruction through a Response to Intervention and Instruction (RTII) model. Practice opportunities will be provided for application of course concepts.
  • EDSP6020
    ADVANCED INSTRUCTIONAL
    The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Master's Degree Candidates to provide evidenced-based instructional techniques to students with disabilities in inclusion settings. An emphasis is placed on results of research and proven methods of instruction including: modifications and adaptations of materials, co-teaching models, learning strategies, lesson planning, assessment, and transitioning. The purpose and use of assistive technology will also be highlighted.
  • EDSP6025
    RESEARCH BASED ASSESSMENT
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5035, GRADE OF B OR BETTER The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare Master's Degree Candidates to use valid and reliable assessment practices to improve their instruction and to minimize bias. This course will focus on designing and implementing assessments to evaluate the effectiveness of practices and programs for individuals with exceptionalities. In addition, this is the capstone course for the Master's Degree in Special Education program, so Master's Degree Candidates will present their original research projects as a culminating activity.
  • EDUC1010
    INTRO TO EDUCATION AND FIELD
    This course is designed to deepen understanding of the professional world of education and recognize the responsibilities of an effective and ethical educator. Students will become familiar with the teacher expectations outlined in the PA Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators and the PA Educator Discipline Act. Completing observations in diverse classrooms and school settings will provide students the opportunity to connect course topics to real-world teaching. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to reflect upon their decision to become a teacher by explaining how their learning will impact their future pedagogy
  • EDUC2010
    INITIAL FIELD EXPERIENCE
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This initial field experience course will provide students with the opportunity to observe and reflect on elements within various classroom environments. This experience will allow the student to interact with the learners in a variety of ways, develop knowledge of effective educational practices, and demonstrate professionalism in an educational setting. Seminars will be included with this course in which students will assess, evaluate, and discuss the field experience.
  • EDUC2015
    INTEGRATING THE ARTS THROUGHOUT
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course will present strategies and teaching techniques for integrating the arts throughout the curriculum. Students will develop an understanding of elements and principles of the arts. Students will consider how a classroom environment can support the arts and humanities.
  • EDUC2020
    TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This class focuses on effective instructional strategies for teaching social studies in an inclusive classroom. Students will become familiar with the learning standards and thematic strands of social studies identified by the National Council for the Social Studies, which include the disciplines of geography, history, economics, and civics and government. Emphasis will be on organizing subject matter and translating it to children through a variety of instructional methods. An integral part of the course will be a field experience placement, which will allow the student to connect theory to practice.
  • EDUC2025
    CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
  • EDUC2030
    INTEGRATING HEALTH AND WELLNESS
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC1010, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course will present strategies and teaching techniques for integrating health, safety and physical activity throughout the curriculum. Students will develop an understanding of the elements and principles of health and wellness. Students will consider how a classroom environment can support the physical, motor and social-emotional development of children.
  • EDUC3005
    PRIMARY LITERACY METHODS AND
    This course provides the foundation for teaching literacy aligned with the Pennsylvania Standards for students in the primary grades with a broad range of abilities and cultural backgrounds. The focus is on evidence-based literacy instruction around the essential components of literacy: oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. An integral part of this course will include a practicum in a primary grade (PreK-2nd grade) classroom.
  • EDUC3010
    PRIMARY MATH METHODS AND
    This course provides an exploration of the principles for teaching primary math concepts according to guidelines provided in the Pennsylvania Standards and by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Teacher candidates will become proficient in using math manipulatives to help students learn mathematical concepts. An integral part of this course will be a practicum, where teacher candidates will be placed in a primary classroom (PreK-2nd grade) in order to connect theory with practice.
  • EDUC3020
    INTERMEDIATE LITERACY METHODS
    This course provides the foundation for teaching literacy aligned with the Pennsylvania Core Standards for students in the intermediate grades with a broad range of abilities and cultural backgrounds. The focus is on evidence-based literacy instruction around the following essential components of literacy: phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. An integral part of this course will be a practicum, where teacher candidates will be placed in an intermediate classroom (3rd-6th grade) in order to connect theory with practice.
  • EDUC3025
    INTERMEDIATE MATH METHODS AND
    This course provides an exploration of the principles for teaching intermediate math concepts according to guidelines provided in the Pennsylvania Math Standards and Assessment Anchors and by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Teacher candidates will become proficient in using math manipulatives to help students learn mathematical concepts. An integral part of this course will be a practicum, where teacher candidates will be placed in an intermediate classroom (3rd-6th grade) in order to connect theory with practice.
  • EDUC3030
    INQUIRY BASED SCIENCE METHODS
    The goal of this course is to prepare teacher candidates with an understanding of science content related to the Pennsylvania Science Standards and provide experience with using an inquiry-based approach to plan and teach science lessons. An integral part of this course will be a practicum, where teacher candidates will be placed in a classroom within their certification grade span in order to connect theory with practice.
  • EDUC4005
    EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS AND
    This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates for student teaching and employment in the field of education. Teacher candidates will finalize professional documents, engage in professional development,identify school, district, and community resources, participate in service learning, and research best practices to set professional goals. Assignments will provide an opportunity to share information with multiple stakeholders to support families and children in meaningful and culturally responsive ways. Teacher candidates will demonstrate aspects as outlined in the PA Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators, the PA Educator Discipline Act and the MCEE Code of Ethics.
  • EDUC4051
    INTERNSHIP - EDUCATION
  • EDUC4057
    INDEPENDENT STUDY - EDUCATION
    An independent study is an in-depth examination of a particular topic, under the supervision of a qualified instructor. Independent study is not a substitute for a formal course or graduation requirement. The course is limited to those few students who have demonstrated an unusual level of ability and an intense commitment to a particular area.
  • EDUC4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - EDUCATION
  • EDUC5000
    CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE
    This graduate course provides an overview of the philosophy of middle level education and the characteristics of developmentally responsive instruction. This course will critically examine specific structures and practices that support the unique needs of adolescent learners.
  • EDUC5025
    CREATING POSITIVE LEARNING
    The purpose of this graduate course is to prepare MAT candidates to create and maintain supportive learning environments that promote the healthy development of all adolescents. This course will focus on effective adolescent behavior strategies and appropriate organizational techniques for the classroom.
  • EDUC5097
    EDUCATION- DIRECTED STUDY
  • EDUC6000
    INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES ACROSS
    PREREQUISITE: EDSP5020, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This graduate course provides an in-depth exploration of evidence-based instructional strategies, including the use of technology and other classroom materials, across the core disciplines of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. MAT candidates will design lessons to motivate students within the context of each subject and will create learning opportunities that reflect an understanding of adolescent development.
  • EDUC6025
    PROFESSIONALISM AND ACTION
    COREQUISITE: EDUC6050 This graduate course is intended as a co-requisite for student teaching in teh MAT program, so that teacher candidates can utilize research and data-based decision making to fully participate in collaborative school structures as a professional educator.
  • EDUC6050
    MIDDLE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHING
    PREREQUISITE: EDUC6000, GRADE OR C OR BETTER This culminating graduate course provides MAT candidates with the opportunity to implement the middle level curriculum for all learners during a twelve week supervised student teaching placement in a 4th-8th grade classroom. Under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a university supervisor, the student teacher will demonstrate the pedagogical cycle of planning, managing, instructing, assessing, and reflecting on student growth within the content areas.
  • END-SCHE
    End of schedule.
  • ENED3010
    METHODS OF TEACHING AND
    This course is designed to give the student a broad background in literature for children from pre-school through seventh grade, to explore assumptions that form the basis of what is the best literature for children, to practice creative projects designed to encourage and enrich reading, and to evaluate children's literature as an image-maker and means of transmitting values.
  • ENED3013
    CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011H OR ENGL1011 This course is designed to give the student a broad background in literature for children from pre-school through 7th grade, to explore assumptions that form the basis of what is the best literature for children, to practice creative projects designed to encourage and enrich reading, and to evaluate children's literature as an image maker and means of transmitting values.
  • ENED3030
    LITERATURE OF ADOLESCENTS AND
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This course is designed to give the prospective middle and/or high school English teacher a familiarity with the literature adolescents choose to read, enjoy, and find relevant to their lives. It will present the reasons why teenage readers make the choices that they do and review sources of materials teenagers will read with pleasure. It is also presented to help the prospective professional educator develop a positive attitude toward this kind of literature.
  • ENED3051
    ADVANCED FIELD EXPERIENCE
    In this course, you will learn and apply the definition, components, principles, and strategies of effective classroom management. In addition, you will explore the topics that contribute to developing a positive learning environment for students. These topics include: diversity, motivation theories and strategies, brain-based learning, planning physical spaces, instructional strategies, and assessment. A data and reflection driven 25 hour field experience will be completed in local district classrooms. The final project includes the development of a portfolio reflecting the range of campus and field-based experiences. A rubric will guide you through this process.
  • ENED4051
    SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING
    The student teaching experience is an arranged internship in a local school district. The experience consists of 15 weeks of observation and student teaching. Supervision is provided by faculty in the department of English Education in cooperation with teachers from local schools. In order to receive the college's recommendation for certification the student teacher must earn a grade of at least B in this course. No course work may be taken during the student teaching semester unless approved by the Director, Center for Teacher Education.
  • ENED4057
    INDEPENDENT STUDY - EDUCATION
  • ENED4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - EDUCATION
  • ENGL1001
    COLLEGE READING
    This course is designed to teach students fundamental practices for academic reading.
  • ENGL1002
    SING AND PRAISE: CONTEMPORARY
    This course is designed especially for the non-English major. It is designed to introduce students to the writing of exceptional American poets since the Second World War. This course will also emphasize fundamental principles of English as a discipline, including: attentive and generous readings of texts; the use of primary and secondary sources in interpreting texts; and analysis of both the form and content of a particular genre, in this case, poetry. No prior knowledge of contemporary American poetry is expected. (SLLT)
  • ENGL1011
    ACADEMIC READING AND WRITING
    This course engages students in reading and writing practices essential to academic life, including critical reading, writing in response to texts, revision, and editing.
  • ENGL1011H
    ACADEMIC READING AND WRIT - HONO RS
    This course engages students in the reading and writing practices essential to academic life by requiring students to read both with and against the grain of complex texts and to write in response to them. As this is an Honors course, the schedule of reading and writing assignments is more challenging than the standard composition course in terms of both pace and content. In keeping with the Honors curriculum guidelines, this course also integrates one or more elements of the La Roche University mission (Global, Intercultural, or Social Justice focus) into its core reading and writing objectives.
  • ENGL1012
    ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH
    Prerequisite: ENGL1011. This course engages students in reading, writing and research practices essential to academic life, including developing a project for a research paper, searching for authoritative materials to use in that project, and presenting it in an edited paper that follows academic conventions of documentation and citation.
  • ENGL1012H
    ACADEMIC WRITING AND RES - HONOR S
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 OR ENGL1011H, GRADE OF C OR BETTER This course engages students in the reading and writing practices essential to academic life by requiring students to read both with and against the grain of complex texts and to write in response to them. As this is an Honors course, the schedule of reading and writing assignments is more challenging than the standard composition course in terms of both pace and content. In keeping with the Honors curriculum guidelines, this course also integrates one or more elements of the La Roche University mission (Global, Intercultural, or Social Justice focus) into its core reading and writing objectives.
  • ENGL1050
    METHODS OF TEACHING WRITING:
    This is the first in a series of four one-credit courses designed to prepare students to teach academic writing at the secondary or post-secondary levels and/or to work in a secondary or writers center.
  • ENGL2002
    DRAMATIC LITERATURE
    A study of the principal types of drama, consisting of plays selected from ancient to contemporary times and representing a variety of cultures. Depending on availability, students may have the opportunity to attend live theater as part of the class.
  • ENGL2004
    TOLKIEN
    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of literature by the author J. R. R. Tolkien. Issues to be covered include Tolkien's theories of the fantastic; the mythology underlying his works; the historical contexts in which he wrote; the major themes of his writing; and the enduring influence of his art. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of a major figure in twentieth-century British literature.
  • ENGL2008
    CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 This course is designed to introduce non-majors to literary study through a range of texts from the late 20th century to the present. The focus of the course is to identify and interpret significant thematic and stylistic interests of Western and non-Western contemporary fictions from this period, paying special attention to the various ways of understanding or seeing that characterize the work produced by different cultures or for specific audiences.
  • ENGL2010
    INTRO TO LITERARY STUDY
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 OR ENGL1011H This seminar introduces students majoring in each of the three English programs to the study of literature as an academic discipline. Key literary terms and concepts (genre, style, figurative language, poetics, etc.), central tenets of literary-critical analysis (multiple interpretive strategies, schools of theory, etc.), and basic methodologies of literary study (research techniques, MLA-style documentation, etc.) will be covered. The course will thus prepare English majors at an early point in their careers to enter into the habits of thought and practice characteristic of their chosen field.
  • ENGL2012
    AMERICAN ETHNIC LITERATURE
    A study of writing about American ethnicity. Readings usually include essays, poems, plays and prose fiction.
  • ENGL2014
    READING LIST PREPARATION
    This course prepares English Studies: Literature majors for the three components of the departmental reading list assessment (exam, critical papers, and annotated bibliographies). The course emphasizes critical reading habits, test study and preparation, and the conventions of academic writing.
  • ENGL2015
    ISSUES AND DEBATES ACROSS
    Through a critical analysis of primary source Western and non-Western texts and images, classic and contemporary essays, as well as visual arguments from popular culture, students will explore similar and opposing viewpoints on globally-themed problems, debates and issues. The focus of the course is to engage students with topics common to cultures and eras so they will apprehend the global reach of social, political, environmental, and economic phenomena.
  • ENGL2016
    THE HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE
    This course explores the Holocaust through selected works of literature and film. Topics to be covered include the history and legacy of the Holocaust, the significance of eyewitness testimony and memory, the role of later-generation texts, and the relationship of Holocaust literature and film to contemporary issues. (SLLT)
  • ENGL2017
    SHAKESPEARE ON FILM (SLLT)
    This course is designed to introduce non-majors to literary study through viewing film adaptations of Shakespeare in conjunction with reading the printed texts. By examining the relationship between the texts of the plays and their film interpretations, students will also be able to examine and analyze dramatic genres central to literary study and the study of Shakespeare: tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances. (SLAE)
  • ENGL2018
    THE FIRE AND THE ROSE: RELIGIOUS
    This course is designed especially for the non-English major. It is designed to introduce students to the writing of exceptional religious poetry across cultures and throughout time. This course will also emphasize fundamental principles of English as a discipline, including: attentive and generous readings of texts; the use of primary and secondary sources in interpreting texts; and analysis of both the form and content of a particular genre, in this case, poetry. No prior knowledge of contemporary American poetry is expected. (SLLT)
  • ENGL2021
    WORLD LITERATURE I (SLLT)
    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of world literature from the Ancient period to the Early Modern era (c. 1600). Issues to be covered include the oral-performative origins of ancient literature; the cultural values and social roles embodied in the literature; and the nature of literary language, genres, and traditions. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of important works of world literature. (SLLT)
  • ENGL2022
    WORLD LITERATURE II (SLLT)
    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of world literature from the Early Modern era (c. 1600) to the present. Issues to be covered include the relationship of global imperialism to World literary traditions; the rise of literatures of resistance; and the major schools of contemporary literary theory. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of important works of world literature. (SLLT)
  • ENGL2025
    WRITING POETRY
    This course will focus on reading and writing poetry in a variety of forms. The students will be writing poems in response to those which we read and discuss. Poetry assignments will include variety of exercises on technique and craft.
  • ENGL2029
    BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This course is designed to teach students best practices in both written and oral business communication. Types of communications include: business letters, emails, reports, executive summaries, cover letters, resumes, PowerPoint presentations, and the job interview.
  • ENGL2030
    TECHNICAL WRITING
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H Designed to apply the basic principles of communication to technical information so that the student can learn to present complex technical messages in the clearest possible way.
  • ENGL2035
    MORAL OF THE STORY
    This course addresses prominent global issues and problems through the dual lens of philosophical ethics and literature. The nature of the course is global in its attention to a wide range of issues stemming from globalization, including those pertaining to the environment, society, religion, and politics; it is also interdisciplinary in its employment of both Ethics and World Literature as vehicles for the analysis of such global concerns. Students read selections of classic and contemporary literature by renowned authors and investigate issues of global ethics evoked within the texts. This is accompanied by an examination of basic philosophical theories and principles in moral reasoning as they pertain to the relevant ethical issues.
  • ENGL2035H
    MORAL OF THE STORY - HONORS
    This course addresses prominent ethical issues and controversies found in world literary texts. The nature of the course is interdisciplinary in that it offers students a fundamental grounding in both Philosophical Ethics and World Literature. Students are introduced to classic and contemporary literature by renowned authors. From various works, students then investigate the most critical ethical issues evoked within the texts. This is accompanied by an examination of basic philosophical theories and principles in moral reasoning as they pertain to the relevant ethical issues.
  • ENGL2036
    AMERICAN MULTICULTURAL LIT
    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of American literature from the early contact period to the Civil War. Issues to be covered include the pervasive influence of cultural contact, slavery, and ethnic diversity on American literary traditions; the quest for distinctively American literary subjects; and the diverse forms of narrative that arose during the nineteenth century. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of important works of American literature.
  • ENGL2039
    MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE
    This course emphasizes the careful reading of works of American literature from the close of the Civil War to the present. Issues to be covered include the diversity of voices represented in the American literary tradition; the cultural, political, economic, ethnic, and regional contexts within which these literatures were forged; and the transformation of American literary traditions after the Civil War, as represented by such major developments as Realism, Modernism, the New Negro Renaissance, and the growth of ethnic literatures. The course serves as an introduction to the study of literature for all majors, as well as an opportunity for English majors to expand their knowledge of important works of American literature. (SLAE)
  • ENGL2040
    CREATIVE WRITING
    A course designed to stimulate writing in prose and poetry, with emphasis on readings and exercises in craft.
  • ENGL2042
    SCIENCE FICTION
    A study of the science fiction genre from its earliest prototypes to the present. We will situate science fiction within its historical and scientific contexts, focusing on the genre as a vehicle for exploring questions regarding humanity, society, and technology.
  • ENGL2043
    FILM ANALYSIS: FORM, HISTORY,
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This course will introduce students to the terminology, methodologies, and practice of cinematic analysis. We will approach films as complex, multi-layered texts that can be viewed through diverse, intersecting lenses; beginning with an examination of the form principles of film, we will progress to a consideration of film as historical, cultural, and ideological product, one that both shapes and is shaped by the beliefs and practices of the cultures in which it is generated. Class time will be divided between film viewing and film analysis, the ultimate purpose of the course being to prepare students to become active, critical viewers of film.
  • ENGL2045
    NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
    In this class, we will read selected works of Native American literature (Including political writing, oral literature, autobiography, and contemporary fiction), as well as selected critical works that raise questions about the primary texts: questions of form, definition, and so on. The course is not a survey; though we'll be reading a good number of texts, I've made no attempt to cover the "whole" range of Native American literatures. Not only is that impossible, but the very idea of wholeness is problematic in my eyes, particularly (as we will see) when discussing texts that fall under a heading so historically and theoretically troubles as that of "Native American literatures". What we will do in the class, instead, is employ particular texts as occasions for reflection, descussin, and debate. In this way, eash studnet will have experienced enough of the range, complexity, and significance of Native American literatures to explore the field independently after the class comes to an end.
  • ENGL2047
    WRITING AND SINGING THE BLUES:
    This course is designed especially for the non-English major and explores the fundamental principles of literary and cultural analysis and an overview of the African-American tradition in music: call and response, spirituals, work songs, soul, jazz, rhythm and blues, rap, and gospel music. No prior knowledge of music or literary theory is expected. (SLDD)
  • ENGL2050
    WRITER'S CENTER;
    This is the second in a series of four one-credit courses designed to prepare students to teach academic writing at the secondary or post-secondary levels and/or to work in a secondary or writers' center. This course addresses one-on-one and small group tutorial work in a writers' center.
  • ENGL2052
    SPORTS WRITING:
    This Sports Writing course is designed to teach you how to write live coverage of America?s four major sports: baseball; football; basketball; and hockey. Prerequisites: There are no academic prerequisites for this course, although Journalism I (ENGL3031) is highly recommended.
  • ENGL3000
    ENGLISH 3000-LEVEL
  • ENGL3011
    READINGS IN CREATIVE NON-FICTION
    This course will provide students with a broad understanding and practical exposure to the craft of contemporary American creative nonfiction, sometimes called literary journalism. Students will read and respond to two anthologies and one book-length work, while acquiring the skills needed to produce their own creative nonfiction works.
  • ENGL3012
    SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPOSITION
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012H OR ENGL1012 These topics courses are writing workshops designed to allow students to write in a particular genre and/or for a designated audience with the support of a publishing writer and the other members of the workshop.
  • ENGL3014
    WORLD MYTHOLOGY
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of myths and mythic patterns in literature from a variety of cultures. Because of the vast quantity of literature involving mythology, the course emphasizes certain themes or patterns, for example, the journey of the hero or heroine, patterns of transformation and mythic motifs.
  • ENGL3015
    STUDIES IN LITERATURE (SLLT1015)
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H THEATER IN THE CITY: Theater in the City is a six-week summer course, which meets on Tuesdays on campus and sees a play on Thursday at one of the city's many theaters. Summer 2012 the planned selections are Noel Coward's "Private Lives" (Pittsburgh Public Theater); Lee Hall's "The Pitman Painters" (Irish and Classical Theater); Maggie Kate Coleman's "Pop" (City Theater); Frank Floyd Hightower's "The House That Carol Built" (Kuntu Repertory Theater); and August Wilson's "Gem of the Ocean" (Pittsburgh Playwrights at the August Wilson Theater). Cross-listed with SLLT1015 WOMEN IN LITERATURE: This course explores the novel as it has been practiced by women writers and examines specific contributions they have made to the novel. It is particularly appropriate to study women writers in the context of the novel form, since historically the rise of the novel occurs concurrently with the emergence of women writers. Each novel will be considered individually as well as in relation to its larger cultural context and to the other novels under study. Authors generally include Mary Wollstonecraft, Virginia Woolf, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jean Rhys, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Amy Tan, Sue Monk Kidd, Linda Hogan, and Katherine Stockett. Cross-listed with SLLT1015 Topics from world literature involving various literary genres and themes. Possible semester topics include: Black Literature, Contemporary Literature, Women in Literature, and Biblical Themes in Literature.
  • ENGL3016
    DRAMATIC LITERATURE
    *pending Senate approval*
  • ENGL3017
    IRISH LITERATURE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of Irish literature from Ancient Gaelic times, through the Irish Renaissance and up to contemporary times. Readings, in English, involve a variety of genres: myths, sagas, lyric poems, plays and short stories. Selections will vary but will usually include works by: Synge, Yeats, Lady Gregory, Joyce, O'Casey, Boland, and Heaney.
  • ENGL3018
    DRAMATIC LITERATURE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of the principal types of drama, consisting of plays selected from ancient to contemporary times and representing a variety of cultures. Students will have the opportunity to attend live theater as part of the class.
  • ENGL3019
    MODERN AMERICAN DRAMA
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of selected plays of 20th century American dramatists from Eugene O’Neill to August Wilson. Students will have the opportunity to attend live theater as part of the class.
  • ENGL3020
    MODERN AMERICAN NOVEL
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of major novels from the rise of realism to the present. The course focuses on the work of such established writers as Fitzgerald, Faulkner and Steinbeck, but may include some fiction by contemporary writers.
  • ENGL3022
    DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH NOVEL
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of the novel from its beginnings: selected writings demonstrate the development of the novel as an art form, usually including works of Fielding, Austen, Thackeray, C. Bronte, E. Bronte, Dickens, Hardy, Lawrence and Joyce.
  • ENGL3023
    SHAKESPEARE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012H OR ENGL1012 The reading and analysis of Shakespearean drama. Plays studied may include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard II, Measure for Measure, Henry IV, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Winter’s Tale.
  • ENGL3024
    LOVE AND WAR OLD AND MEDIEVAL
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H Literary works are selected from the genres of epic, romance, lyric and ballad. Selections may include: Beowulf, Troilus and Cressida, Tristan and Isolde, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and The Canterbury Tales.
  • ENGL3025
    RENAISSANCE ENGLISH POETRY
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This course will emphasize the non-dramatic poetry of Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Vaughan, Aemilia Lanyer, and the short poems of Milton.
  • ENGL3027
    NINETEENTH CENTURY BRITISH
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A survey of the Romantic poetry of Burns, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats and of the Victorian poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, the Rossettis, Clough, Hopkins, and Hardy.
  • ENGL3028
    EARLY 20th CENTURY BRITISH LIT
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of British literature written during the first half of the twentieth century. Novels and poems studied may include the works of Conrad, Forster, Woolf, Bowen, Yeats, Eliot, Joyce, Owens and Thomas.
  • ENGL3029
    LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This course will introduce advanced students to literary theory and contemporary methods of literary criticism and research.
  • ENGL3031
    JOURNALISM I
    This is an introductory course in journalistic style and a variety of media formats. Students learn editing, interviewing and reporting skills.
  • ENGL3032
    JOURNALISM II
    PREREQUSITE: ENGL3031 This is an advanced course in newspaper writing, focusing primarily on the production of a variety of news stories. Special emphasis is placed on research, interviewing and advanced reporting skills.
  • ENGL3033
    AMERICAN ENG:ITS HISTORY &
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H A study of the linguistic evolution of the American English language from the older stages of English to current usage in the United States.
  • ENGL3034
    WRITING FOR ADVERTISING
    This course is designed to teach students how to write advertising copy that targets various audiences and employs multiple venues: print, radio, TV, and the internet.
  • ENGL3035
    WRITING FOR BROADCAST AND SOCIAL
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 OR ENGL1011H A course designed to give students practice in the writing of copy for the broadcast media. Included is the writing of news and sports reports, commercials, features and documentaries, interview techniques, and mini-dramas.
  • ENGL3037
    ADVANCED EXPOSITION
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H An advanced course in essay writing with emphasis on improving writing style. Methods include an examination of professional writings, frequent written assignments, detailed criticism of student's papers and evaluation of revisions to increase writing flexibility and precision.
  • ENGL3040
    TEACHING LITERATURE I: METHODS
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This first in a two-part sequence of one-credit courses begins the process of preparing students to teach literature at the secondary school level. Students enrolled in these courses will simultaneously be enrolled in a 200-level literature survey; the courses will provide occasion for reflection on and work with the materials and methodologies of the teaching of literature. The sequence thus provides a foundation for theoretical and practical fluency that will be enhanced throughout the English Education curriculum, culminating in Methods of Teaching English and in the Student Teaching experience.
  • ENGL3041
    TEACHING LITERATURE II: METHODS
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This second in a two-part sequence of one-credit courses begins the process of preparing students to teach literature at the secondary school level. Students enrolled in these courses will simultaneously be enrolled in a 200-level literature survey; the courses will provide occasion for reflection on and work with the material and methodologies of the teaching of literature. The sequence thus provides a foundation for theoretical and practical fluency that will be enhanced throughout the English Education curriculum, culminting in Methods of Teaching English and in the Student Teaching experience.
  • ENGL3042
    WRITING FOR NON-PROFITS
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 AND ENGL1012 (OR ENGL1011H AND ENGL1012H) This course is designed to teach the basic principles of public relations and grant writing for non-profit organizations, combining both theory and practice.
  • ENGL3044
    SPORTS WRITING
    In this course, students will develop an appreciate for the great outdoors and become familiarized with various sports including baseball and football. Sports Writing teaches students how to cover live sporting events and generate their own stores for print and online media following the Associated Press style guidelines.
  • ENGL3045
    WRITING FICTION
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 AND ENGL1012 (OR ENGL1011H AND ENGL1012H) This special topics course enables students to develop the craft of fiction-writing. Subjects to be covered include audience, point of view, characterization, world-building, story arc, dialogue, editing/revising, and publication. Students will develop works of fiction with the support of a publishing writer and the other members of the workshop, and will be provided guidance in submitting polished works for possible publication.
  • ENGL3047
    THEATER IN THE CITY
    This course is designed to teach students the basic components of theater, and to experience various plays being performed in Pittsburgh. It will also examine the history of many of the local theaters in the city. Cross-listed with SLLT1029
  • ENGL3050
    GENRE; METHODS OF TEACHING
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012H OR ENGL1012 This is the third in a series of four one-credit courses designed to prepare students to teach academic writing at the secondary or post-secondary levels and/or to work in a secondary or writers' center.
  • ENGL3051
    PUBLICATION DESIGN
    This course combines the two elements that result in publication: writing and layout. Intended for prospective designers as well as writers, the course will educate students in how words and images work together; functional art in action; font and publication personalities; logo design; newspaper and magazine design; public service publications; newsletters; and the art of popular culture.
  • ENGL3064
    WRITING CREATIVE NONFICTION
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011/H AND ENGL1012/H AND ENGL3011 AND ENGL3031 AND ENGL3032 This course expands upon the material taught in Journalism I, Journalism II, and Readings in Creative Nonfiction by inviting students to produce multiple creative nonfiction pieces about, but not limited to, people, places, things, and personal essays.
  • ENGL3065
    WOMEN IN LITERATURE
    This course explores the novel as it has been practiced by women writers as well as the specific contributions they have made to the novel. It is particularly appropriate to study women writers in the context of the novel form, since historically the rise of the novel occurs concurrently with the emergence of women writers. Each novel will be considered individually as well as in relation to its larger cultural context and to the other novels under study.
  • ENGL3999
    LITERATURE - 3000 LEVEL
  • ENGL4035
    PORTFOLIO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP
    This course will teach senior Professional Writing and Journalism majors how to produce a professional portfolio of their work within an eight-week workshop format.
  • ENGL4040
    SPECIAL TOPIC IN LITERATURE
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1011 OR ENGL1011H The "Special Topics" designation covers a range of courses with varying content or "subject" matter but with the common objective of providing non-majors with an opportunity to learn the fundamental principles of literary analysis.
  • ENGL4050
    SEQUENCING AND ASSESSMENT;
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This is the fourth in a series of four one-credit courses designed to prepare students to teach academic writing at the secondary or post-secondary levels and/or to work in a secondary or writer' center.
  • ENGL4051
    INTERNSHIP I @
    A field experience in selected professional environments. The student is given the opportunity to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical application under the guidance of professionals at the particular institution to which the student is assigned.
  • ENGL4052
    INTERNSHIP II - ENGLISH
    A field experience in selected professional environments. The student is given the opportunity to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical application under the guidance of professionals at the particular institution to which the student is assigned.
  • ENGL4054
    SEMINAR IN PUBLICATION
    PREREEQUISITE: ENGL1012H OR ENGL1012 This senior capstone course equips students with the tools, practices, and habits of mind of the publishing writer. Students will develop a written work in their preferred genre - short fiction, poetry, literary scholarship, creative nonfiction, journalistic prose, etc. - and seek publication in an appropriate market. While attaining publication is not a requirement of the course, students will use the process to acquire familiarity with the resources, strategies, and standards fundamental to publication in their chosen field.
  • ENGL4055
    SEMINAR IN PUBLICATION
    PREREQUISITE: ENGL1012 OR ENGL1012H This senior capstone course equips students with the tools, practices, and habits of mind of the publishing writer. Students will develop a written work in their preferred genre?short fiction, poetry, literary scholarship, creative nonfiction, journalistic prose, etc.?and seek publication in an appropriate market. While attaining publication is not a requirement of the course, students will use the process to acquire familiarity with the resources, strategies, and standards fundamental to publication in their chosen field.
  • ENGL4056
    DIRECTED RESEARCH - ENGLISH
    Individual investigation in the student's field of interest carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. The student is responsible for defining a problem, planning a course of investigation and reporting the results in a critical paper accompanied by an annotated bibliography.
  • ENGL4057
    INDEPENDENT STUDY - ENGLISH
    Individual study course that is supervised by a full-time faculty member.
  • ENGL4097
    DIRECTED STUDY - ENGLISH
  • ENGL9995
    ENGLISH - WRITING ELECTIVE
  • ENGL9996
    ENGLISH - FILM AND DRAMA
  • ENGR0022
    MATERIALS STRUCTURE AND
  • ENGR0135
    STATICS AND MECHANICS OF
  • EXCHANGE
    EXCHANGE PROGRAM
  • EXSP2014
    KINESIOLOGY (HSCU2014)
    PREREQUISITE: BIOL1024 Kinesiology is an introductory course for students pursuing a clinical or non-clinical health sciences major. The course also introduces students to the four subdisciplines of Kinesiology comprising 1. Physiology, 2. Psychology, 3. Motor learning, and 4. Biomechanics. The course is intended for students with career interests in human movement as it relates to motor performance, activities of daily living, physical fitness and sports related activities.
  • EXSP2015
    SOCIAL & POLITICAL ASPECTS OF
    This course will provide students an opportunity to discover social, political and cultural aspects that impact one’s ability to engage in healthy behaviors including regular physical activity and healthy nutrition. Students will learn not only how individual choices influence one’s decision to engage in healthy behaviors, but also the institutional, environmental and political forces that are involved. Cross-listed with HSCU2015
  • EXSP3***
    EXERCISE & SPORTS SCIENCE -
  • EXSP3005
    MOTOR LEARNING, CONTROL AND
    PREREQUISITE: PSYC1021, BIOL1024, BIOL1024L This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical differences and application in motor skill development across the life span. Topics will include motor learning, motor control and motor development experienced during growth and development and used in physical activity, exercise, and sport performance. (HSCU3005)
  • EXSP3007
    BIOMECHANICS (HSCU3007)
    PREREQUISITE: MATH1010, BIOL1024, BIOL1024L This course is a study of the science of human movement and will provide students the understanding and analysis of structure and mechanical functioning of human movement and motor skills used for physical activity, exercise, and sports performance. Cross-listed with HSCU3007
  • EXSP3025
    EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND SPORTS
    PREREQUISITE: BIOL1024 AND BIOL1024L This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles Sports Nutrition and Exercise Physiology with an emphasis on wellness promotion throughout life.
  • EXSP3025L
    EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY - LABORATORY
    A series of laboratory applications related to the content of HSCU3015 Exercise Physiology and Sport Nutrition will emphasize the assessment and testing of various types of exercise and energy metabolism during physical activity, exercise, and sports performance. Students will learn to assess and evaluate body typing and body composition. Prereqs: BIOL1024 & BIOL1024L & HSCU3014
  • EXSP3030
    FITNESS TESTING AND EXERCISE
    PREREQUISITE: HSCU3025 AND EXSP3025 This class will provide students an opportunity to learn in both lecture and hands-on approaches about a variety of common fitness tests related to cardiovascular and muscular fitness and flexibility. Students will also learn the principles of exercise prescription for healthy adults, and modifications for apparently healthy children and older adults. Cross-listed with HSCU3030
  • EXSP4003
    STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING
    PREREQUISITE: HSCU3025, EXSP3025, HSCU3007, EXSP3007 This course is designed for students to learn and apply the theory and principles of strength and conditioning based from the study of kinesiology, exercise physiology, motor learning, motor control motor development, and biomechanics. Students will be able to design individual strength and conditioning protocols for physical activity, exercise, and sport performance activities. Cross-listed with HSCU4003
  • EXSP4005
    CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
    PREREQUISITE: HSCU3025, EXSP3007, EXSP3025, EXSP3007 This course will provide students the knowledge base to understand the impact and limitations of chronic disease and special populations on activities of daily living (ADL), physical activity, and exercise. Students will be able to assess, evaluate, and prescribe individual exercise protocols to individuals diagnosed with conditions such as heart disease, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, respiratory disorders, asthma, arthritis, and cancer. Cross-listed with HSCU4005
  • EXSP4051
    INTERNSHIP I @
  • EXSP4052
    INTERNSHIP II @
  • EXSP4056
    DIRECTED RESEARCH- EXERCISE
  • EXSP4097
    DIRECTED STUDY -EXERCISE SCIENCE